The Learning Brain: Lessons for Education

Front Cover
Wiley, Jun 24, 2005 - Psychology - 224 pages
3 Reviews
In this groundbreaking book, two leading authorities in the field review what we really know about how and when the brain learns, and consider the implications of this knowledge for educational policy and practice.
  • Pioneering book in emerging field from two leading authorities
  • Reviews in an accessible style what we know about how and when the brain learns
  • Draws out the implications of this knowledge for educational policy and practice
  • Covers studies on learning during the whole of development, including adulthood
  • Looks at what we can learn from brain research about children with learning difficulties, and how this can inform remedial education

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: The Learning Brain: Lessons for Education

User Review  - Goodreads

Excellent book, loved all the neuroscience and cognitive science research presented without any hints of reductionism. Read full review

Review: The Learning Brain: Lessons for Education

User Review  - Goodreads

A well-balanced and informative study of what brain science can tell us about how and where learning takes place in the brain. Easily readable for the non-specialist, demonstrating both the knowledge ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2005)

Sarah-Jayne Blakemore is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience at University College, London. She is engaged in neuroscience research, for which she obtained the 2001 British Psychological Society Award for Outstanding Doctoral Research. She has been seconded to the Houses of Parliament to write a report on Early Years Education for Select Committee for Education. Her involvement in the Public Engagement with Science is demonstrated in her frequent public lectures and scientific consultancy on a major BBC series on the Human Mind.

Uta Frith is Professor of Cognitive Development and Deputy Director of the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience at University College, London. She has researched developmental disorders for more than 30 years. She is a leading authority on autism and dyslexia and has gained prestigious prizes and honorary doctorates. She is the author of well known books on autism and Asperger syndrome. Her work has led to greater awareness of disorders of cognitive and social development with a basis in the brain.

Bibliographic information