An Account of the Mutinies in Oudh, and of the Siege of the Lucknow Residency ...

Front Cover
R. Bentley, 1858 - India - 570 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 484 - That young lady had a talent for describing the involvements, and feelings, and characters of ordinary life, which is to me the most wonderful I ever met with. The Big Bow-wow strain I can do myself like any now going ; but the exquisite touch, which renders ordinary commonplace things and characters interesting, from the truth of the description and the sentiment, is denied to me.
Page 312 - The Major-General, therefore, in gratitude for and admiration of the brilliant deeds in arms achieved by General Havelock and his gallant troops, will cheerfully waive his rank on the occasion; and will accompany the force to Lucknow in his civil capacity as Chief Commissioner of Oude, tendering his military services to General Havelock as a volunteer.
Page 312 - Major-General, therefore," the order proceeded, " in gratitude for, and admiration of, the brilliant deeds in arms achieved by General Havelock and his gallant troops, will cheerfully waive his rank on the occasion, and will accompany the force to Lucknow in his civil capacity as Chief Commissioner of Oudh, tendering his military services to General Havelock as a volunteer. On the relief of Lucknow the Major-General will resume his position at the head of the forces.
Page 80 - Thucydides ; but it is impossible to shut one's eyes to the fact that the...
Page 15 - This book is one of which it is not too high praise to assert, that it approaches as nearly to perfection, in its own line, as any historical work perhaps ever did.
Page 125 - I was 300 yards off at the utmost. Poor Lysaght was kneeling out in the open ground, with his hands folded across his chest, and, though not using his firearms, the cowardly wretches would not go up to the spot until they shot him ; and then rushing up, they killed the wounded and children, butchering them in a most cruel way. With the exception of the drummer boy, every one was killed of the above list, and besides, poor good Thomason and one or two clerks. They denuded the bodies of their clothes,...
Page 27 - Mr. Trollope amply bears out in the work the reputation he acquired by ' Barchester Towers.' We regard the tenderness and self-sacrifice of Linda as one of the most graceful and touching pictures of feminine heroism in the whole range of modern novels."— John, Bull.
Page 441 - Our loss has been chiefly from the sun, and their heavy guns. Our rations will last a fortnight, and we are still well supplied with ammunition. Our guns are serviceable. Report says that troops are advancing from Allahabad ; and any assistance might save our garrison. We, of course, are prepared to hold out to the last. It is needless to mention the names of those who have been killed, or died. We trust in God ; and if our exertions here assist your safety, it will be a consolation to know that...
Page 424 - Nujeef has never been surpassed in daring, and the success of it was most brilliant and complete. 6. The movement of retreat of last night, by which the final rescue of the garrison was effected, was a model of discipline and exactness. The consequence was that the enemy was completely deceived, and the force retired by a narrow, tortuous lane, the only line of retreat open, in the face...
Page 446 - Sir J. Outram, GCB, and Sir H. Havelock, KCB " 2. The persevering constancy of this small garrison, under the watchful command of the Brigadier, has, under Providence, been the means of adding to the prestige of the British Army and of preserving the honour and lives of our countrywomen.

Bibliographic information