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CHRISTIAN CHURCHES. By Joseph Angus,

D.D. Hodder & Stoughton. This is a new and cheap edition of a prize essay that had a deservedly large circulation on the occasion of its first issue. Dr. Angus has done well to send forth another edition of this exposition of the nature, discipline, and government of the Christian Church. It is a scriptural, luminous, and living representation of the noblest form of social life, and is pre-eminently adapted for service in a time when chief bishops are treated as chief magicians, and Christian churches are being converted into pagan hierarchies.

A copy given to every young Christian would be seed well sown. The cost is sixpence, or at the rate of one pound for fifty copies.

strained to read it. It is a story of a man who did service for his own generation in such a wise and worthy manner that his worth abides to-day, and will abide for generations to

We strongly advise our readers to purchase this pamphlet, and distribute it far and near. Mon who use literature as a means of doing good should invest in this forthwith. It only costs threopence; and quantities can be had for circulation at cheaper rates.

66

THOMAS WILSON, THE SILKMAN. A life

for business men. By G. W. M'Cree.

Marlborough. How to make business a means of grace, i.e., a contributor to the best life of the business man and of the world, is one of the practical problems of Christian mon. A theoretical solution might be of some use; a living exemplification of the solution of the problem must be a large benefit. Mr. M'Cree has placed this benefit within the reach of all in a brief, well-arranged, and telling biography of Thomas Wilson. Would that young men “starting in business life” could be con

“A REASON FOR THE HOPE THAT IS IN

YOU;" OR WHAT THE BAPTISTS BELIEVE

AND Why. By Rev. W. Hanson. Stock. So long as Baptists exist in separato organization from other Christians it will be necessary to produce a literature in defence of our position, our convictions, and practises. Many Christians fail to see any dignity in Baptism, and less reason for treating theories concerning it as divisive lines in Christendom. Scriptural Baptism is misconstrued, and therefore our position and acts are misrepresented. Mr. Hanson's book will do good work in fortifying the faith of the young, informing all who care to know the grounds of our conduct, and in defending us from the attacks of those who differ from us. The young people of our congregations should

be plenteously provided with this little book.

Church Register.

Information should be sent by the 16th of the month to 51, Porchester Road, Westbourne Park,

London, W.
CONFERENCES.

President, Mr. Councillor Binns. The THE LANCASHIRE

AND
YORKSHIRE

Rev. B. Wood then gave his Inaugural CONFERENCE was held at Hepstonstall

Address. Subject, “ The Power of Bap

tist Nonconformity,” and it was resolved, Slack, June 4th. The morning service was opened by

“ That we thank the President, the Rev. the Rev. W. Gray, and the Rev. W. Dyson

B. Wood, for his well-timed and useful read a paper, subject, “Is the Baptist

address, and request him to send it to the Denomination declining.” Discussion fol

Editor for insertion in the Magazine.” lowed, opened by the Rev. W. Chapman.

I. The best thanks of the Conference Reports of churches shewed that most were given to the Rev. W. Gray and Mr. of the churches were in a healthy state.

James Bramley for their efficient serBaptized, 117; candidates, 22.

vices as President and Vice-President of At the afternoon session the Rev. W.

the past year. Gray, the retiring President, opened the II. The Rev. J. R. GODFREY being moeting and introduced the President about to remove from Nazebottom, thu elect, the Rev. B. Wood, of Bradford ; pastorate of which church he has honand Mr. James Bramley, the retiring ourably and usefully sustained for the Vice-President, introduced the new Vice- period of seven years, “ This Conference

CHURCH REGISTER.

291

desires to record its grateful sense of the good service our brother has rendered to the whole district during his residence amongst us, and while we are sorry to lose his presence and help, we assure him of our best wishes, and of our earnest prayers, for his future happiness and prosperity in his new sphere of labour.”

III. That we heartily welcome into this Conference the new church at MossLEY, near Manchester, praying that success may attend the efforts of pastor and people.

IV. Missions. Rev. Watson Dyson was elected a member of the FOREIGN MISSION Committee, and the late Committee for HOME MISSIONS was re-appointed.

V. In accordance with the request of the friends at Preston the President visit them, and conduct special services.

VI. Next CONFERENCE at West Vale, on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 1879. Preacher, Rev. Wesley Wood, in case of failure Mr. James Bramley, of Halifax. Home Mission meeting to be held in the evening. Speakers, Rev. J. Bentley, W. Gray, and J. Turner.

JOHN S. GILL, Sec.

ference, representing the General Baptist Churches of the midland counties, sorrowfully deprecates the Zulu War, which has not only suspended missionary operations, but also, in a great measure, detracted from the results issuing out of the noble work of Livingstone, Moffatt, and others, and considers that the bold efforts put forth by the Zulu tribes in fighting for their independence do not justify a war of extermination. This Conference therefore prays Her Majesty's Government to take any favourable opportunity that may arise for concluding peace.”

V. A paper was read by Mr. Cholerton, of Swadlincote, on “Nonconformity in our villagos,” for which he was cordially thanked. An interesting discussion followed.

VI. The following arrangements were made for the next Conference :-Place, Beeston; time, Tuesday, October 21; preacher, Rev. J.J. Fitch, of Nottingham. The Rev. W. Evans to read a paper at the afternoon session “On the Duty of our Churches in Relation to the College.”

VII. Very cordial votes of thanks were passed to the Rev. W. H. Tetley for his excellent discourse, and to the friends at Barton for their abundant hospitality.

Mr. Yemm, of Measham, preached in the evening, when a vote of Christian sympathy with the Rev. J. Greenwood in his protracted affliction was most heartily agreed to.

The meetings of the Conference were very numerously attended, and were very pleasant and profitable.

J. SALISBURY, Secretary.

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MIDLAND CONFERENCE.—The Whitsuntide Conference was held at Barton, June 4th. The Chairman for the year, Rev. J. Alcorn, conducted the morning meeting. After devotional exercises the Rev. W. H. Tetley preached from John xiv. 22.

The Conference met in the afternoon, when the following business was transacted:

I. The church at WHITEMOOR, near Old Basford, was received, on its application, into the Midland Conference.

II. As three names go off the list of representatives of the Conference on the HOME MISSION Committee. it was resolved — That Messrs. Bembridge, G. Payne of Leicester, and J. Lamb of Derby, be appointed. It was further resolved, for the same reason, that the Rev. J. Alcorn, J. W. Williams, and W. Evans, represent the Conference on the FOREIGN Missionary Committee.

III. A statement was made by the the Rev. W. R. Stevenson, M.A., respecting the operations of the Evangelistic Agency conducted under the direction of the Midland Baptist Union. The churches were urged-especially those in the rural districts—to avail themselves of the services of Mr. Wallace, the newly-appointed agent of the Union. Mr. Wallace also made a brief statement of the nature of the evangelistic work in which he was engaged.

IV. The following resolution was unanimously passed :-" That this Con

DERBY BAPTIST PREACHERS'

ASSOCIATION. HALF-YEARLY Conference was held at Windley on Whit-Tuesday. Attendance good. Reports from churches, praying, working, baptizing, and getting debts off. The evening meeting was presided over by Mr. G. Dean. Addresses by Messrs. Swann, Kirk, and Malpas.

J. SMITH, Secretary.

NOTTINGHAMSHIRE LOCAL

PREACHERS' ASSOCIATION. The Quarterly Meeting was held, June 2, at Eastwood. The reports from the sixteen churches in the Association were good, and gave a total of thirty-three baptized during the quarter. The business meeting was full of interest; and besides the ordinary routine there was ono special matter requiring immediate attention, namely, the purchase of land at KIMBERLEY on which to build a school and chapel. The Rev. T. Watkinson preMARRIAGES.

sided at the public meeting, and addresses were delivered by brethren Richardson, Sharman, Ward, and Belton.

CHAPELS. HITCHIN, Walsworth Road.-A public meeting was held May 26, Mr. Apthorpe, of Cambridge, in the chair. Revs. J. Clifford, M.A., LL.B., J. Fletcher, J. W. Blake, J. Aldis, and other ministers, gave addresses. It was reported that £300 had been promised towards the £500 which we are pledged to raise by June, 1880, for the Building Fund.

CHAWNER-LAWSON.-May 29, at the G. B. Chapel, Old Basford, by Rev. J. Alcorn, Mr. Joseph Chawner to Miss Sarah Lawson, both of Old Basford.

FIDLER-STENSON.- June 3, at the G. B. Chapel, Sawley, by Mr. Stenson, Samuel Fidler, grocer, only son of Robert Fidler, Whittington Moor, near Chesterfield, to Sarah, youngest daughter of Thomas Stenson, of Sawley, Derbyshire.

HITCHCOCK-Lawson.-May 15, at the G. B. Chapel, Old Basford, by Rev. J. Alcorn, Mr. Thomas Miles Hitchcock, of Willesdon, Lon. don, to Miss Emily Lawson, of Old Basford.

OSMAND-FOWLER.-June 11, at the Baptist Chapel, Crowle, Lincolnshire, by Rev. J. Stutterd, Mr. Edmund_Osmand, of Bacup, Lancashire, to Miss Fowler, of Godknow Bridge, near Crowle.

OBITUARIES.

SCHOOLS. LONDON, Commercial Road.June 1st Rev. J. Fletcher presented the prize and certificates to the successful competitors at the Examination in connection with the East London Auxiliary of the Sunday School Union, on “ The Last Days of Our Lord on the Earth.” Twenty-two entered; nineteen went up for examination. Result-one prize, fifteen certificates; viz., one specially distinguished, ten first class, four second class. Our success is largely due to our pastor.

ANNIVERSARIES. ALLERTON. Preacher, Rev. W. E. Winks. Collections, £32.

ASHBY.—Preacher, Rev. J. Clifford. Collections, £38.

BERKHAMPSTEAD.—Preacher, Rev. J. Fletcher. Collections, £10.

BURNLEY, Enon.—Preachers, Rev.J.C. Jones, M.A., and Leonard Clement, Esq. Collections, £111 2s. 10d.

DEWSBURY. Preacher, Rev. G. W. M'Cree. Collections, £30.

GAMBLESIDE.-Preacher, Rov.J. Alcorn. Collections, £25 6s. 3d.

GRANTHAM.—Preacher, Mr. W. Myers, of Stapleford. Collections very good.

IBSTOCK.-Preacher, Rev. A. Underwood, M.A. Collection, £23.

JAMES, MRS. PATRICK.–After over twenty years of severe physical suffering from chronic rheumatism, Elizabeth Patrick James, of East Leake, Notts., resigned, in Christian confi. dence, her spirit into the hands of her Maker on May the 31st, 1879, in the sixty-sixth year of her age. She was baptized forty-three years ago, when she was twenty-three years of age, by Mr. Lacey, the missionary, who was then minister of the Leake and Wymeswold church. For over twenty years she continued an active and useful life in her Saviour's service, and was constant in her attendance on the means of grace; but about the age of forty-five the terrible affliction from which she suffered so many years laid its fatal hold upon her, gradually tightening its grasp till the end of her life, and distorting, with cruel pain, every limb and joint, and finally rendering all movement impossible without assistance. It was during this long and painful trial that the precious and soul-sustaining power of a Saviour's love made itself felt by her in all its fulness; and though often depressed in spirit, and disquieted in mind, yet never was she without a deep and sure faith that her Saviour would never leave nor forsake her; and at times her composure, and even joy, was very great. She had learned to say and feel with Christ, “If this cup may not pass from me, except I drink it, Thy will be done." Though so long unable to attend the house of God, she was ever most anxious about the temporal and spiritual prosperity of the cause with which she, and her mother before her, had been so long identified. She was a thorough General Baptist, and a devout believer in “believers baptismi," and ever spoke with faith and affection of the body to which she belonged. Though no one who knew her, or was even related to her, could have wished her life prolonged, her death was attended by the real Christian sympathy and true affection of friends and relatives. It was a singular coincidence that both her and her mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Wootten, were members of the church exactly forty-three years. W. M.

RICKARDS.--June 15, 1879, at Hastings, Lottie Rickards, aged eighteen years and six months. “It was not death for thee to die;

Its sting touched not thy breast;
For He was there whose presence charms
From out the soul all death's alarms;
Thy Jesus held thee in His arms,

And hushed His child to rest."

BAPTISMS CARRINGTON.-Five, at Old Basford, by W. Bown.

COVENTRY.-Fourteen, by W. Reynolds.
GRANTHAM.-Two, by A. Gibson.
GREAT GRIMSBY.-Five, by J. Manning.
LONDON, Borough Road.-Fifteen, by G. W.
M'Cree.

LONGTON.-Seven, by C. T. Johnson.
NETHERSEAL.-Eight, by J. Shakespeare.
OLD BASFORD.--Two, by J. Alcorn.
SHORE.-Five, by J. K. Chappelle.

HARMONIUM FOR ROME. RECEIVED, with many and cordial thanks, 32,176 Bank of England Note Mrs. Reynolds

0 2 0 A Friend, per Rev. E. Stevenson o 3 0 J. CLIFFORD, 51, Porchester Road, W.

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THE

MISSIONARY OBSERVER.

JULY, 1879.

Abstract of the Sixty-second Annual Report.

WITH devout gratitude to God your Committee are permitted to announce that the work of the Mission, both at home and abroad, has been faithfully prosecuted throughout another year. In consequence of the severe depression of trade and commerce it was feared that the income of this Society—like that of many kindred institutions-might show a considerable falling off. But, though the amount received from many of the churches is below the average of former years, your Committee are pleased find that the ordinary receipts for the general purposes of the Mission are in excess of any previous year—a fact which cannot but be gratifying to all sincere lovers of the cause.

THE ORISSA MISSION.

With reference to Orissa there are no startling reports like those which have recently come from the Telegoo country, which joins Orissa, which tell of ten thousand believers being baptized last year by one American Baptist missionary and his twenty-two native assistants. On the part of your brethren, however, there has been patient, persevering, prayerful toil; which, sooner or later, will be crowned with the Divine blessing. ORISSA FOR CHRIST is still their motto, and, with this glorious object in view they toil on, in the fullest persuasion that one day Jesus shall take the place of Juggernath, and that "unto Him shall the gathering of the people be.”

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MISSIONARIES AND NATIVE PREACHERS.

Since the last annual meeting three additions have been made to the European Mission staff in Orissa-Mr. and Mrs. Vaughan and Mr. Heberlet. On the other hand your esteemed brother Miller, after thirtyfour years of faithful service, has been compelled, by shattered health, to return for a season to this country. To him as well as to Mrs. Miller

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your Committee accord a hearty welcome, and trust that by the blessing of God his health may be so far restored as to enable him to resume his labours in the land he so dearly loves.

In the sudden and lamented death of Mrs. Thomas Bailey, your Committee feel that-along with the bereaved husband and three motherless children—the Mission has sustained a very heavy loss. During her residence in the country of between five and six years she devoted herself to the great work in which she was engaged, and though many miles away from any other English lady, she found her happiness in seeking the good of the orphan children and Christian women committed to her care. Information respecting her last illness will be found in the pages

. of the Report.

The following is a list of the ENGLISH MISSIONARIES, and shows the year they entered the service of the Society. WILLIAM BROOKS 1841 MRS. PIKE

1873 MRS. BROOKS 1841 HENRY WOOD

1876 John BUCKLEY, D.D. 1844 MRS. WOOD

1876 MRS. BUCKLEY 1841 John VAUGHAN

1878 WILLIAM MILLER 1845 MRS. VAUGHAN

1878 MRS. MILLER 1852 P. E. HEBERLET

1878 THOMAS BAILEY 1861 Miss PACKER*

1854 JOHN GREGORY PIKE 1873 Miss LEIGH*

1872 The following is a list of the NATIVE MINISTERS, and shows the year when their ministry commenced. POOROOSOOTUM CHOWDRY... 1836 HARAN DAS

1867 SEBO PATRA 1841 GEORGE DAs

1867 DAMUDAR MAHANTY ... 1841 ANUNTA DAS

1872 GHANUSHYAM NAIK

1849 NARRAYAN VARSISTAN 1875 KUMBHO NAIK 1849 BALAJI JENNA

1875 TAMA PATRA 1849 NILADRI NAIK

1876 MAKUNDA DAS

1849 BENJAMIN MAHANTY... 1876 PAUL SINGH

1856 SADA SEBO PRAHARAJ 1877 THOMA SANTRA ... 1856 DOLEE PATRA

1877 SHEM SAHU 1856 DANIEL DAS

1877 MAKUNDA SAHU

...

...

...

...

...

... 1867

THE NATIVE CHURCHES.

From the statistical tables which accompany the Report, it will be seen that the membership of the Mission Churches is increasing in a far greater ratio than the membership at home. It is also gratifying to find that the churches are developing a greater amount of self-reliance

* Agents of the Society for Promoting Female Education in the East.

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