Memoirs of the Court of Queen Elizabeth, Volume 2

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1819 - Great Britain - 522 pages
 

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Page 12 - loos'd his love-shaft smartly from his bow, As it should pierce a hundred thousand hearts ; But I might see young Cupid's fiery shaft Quench'd in the chaste beams of the watry moon, And the Imperial Votress passed on, In maiden meditation, fancy-free.
Page 12 - a certain aim he took At a fair Festal throned by the West, And loos'd his love-shaft smartly from his bow, As it should pierce a hundred thousand hearts ; But I might see young Cupid's fiery shaft Quench'd in the chaste beams of the watry moon, And the Imperial Votress passed on, In maiden meditation, fancy-free.
Page 293 - To feed on hope, to pine with fear and sorrow ; To have thy prince's grace, yet want her peers ; To have thy asking, yet wait many years ; To fret thy soul with crosses and with cares ; To eat thy heart through comfortless despairs ; To
Page 245 - my lieutenantgeneral shall be in my stead, than whom never prince commanded a more noble and worthy subject ; not doubting by your obedience to my general, by your concord in the camp and your valor in the field, we shall shortly have a famous victory over those enemies of my God, of my kingdom and of my people.
Page 437 - the same affectation in her English admirer ;—" How oddly he is suited ! I think he bought his doublet in Italy, his round hose in France, his bonnet in Germany^ and his behavior every where.
Page 467 - he is a doctor ; never rack his person, but rack his style. Let him have pen, ink and paper and help of books ; and be enjoined to continue the story where it breaketh off; and I will undertake, by collating the styles, to judge whether he were the author or no.
Page 18 - to grow. No foreign banish'd wight shall anchor in this port ; Our realm it brooks no strangers' force, let them elsewhere resort. Our rusty sword with rest shall first his edge employ,. To poll their tops that seek such change, and gape for joy. The house of commons, in which
Page 100 - O master Brisk, (as it is in Euphues,) hard is the choice when one is compelled, either by silence to die with grief, or by speaking, to live with shame:' upon which Mr. Whalley observes, that the court ladies in Elizabeth's time had all the phrases of Euphues by heart".
Page 304 - and maces danced before him. His bushy beard and shoe-strings green, His high-crown'd hat and satin doublet, Moved the stout heart of England's queen, Though pope and Spaniard could not trouble it.
Page 83 - more offensive to her feelings ; and by means of what was then accounted a seditious appeal to the passions and prejudices of the nation. The work alluded to was entitled, " The Discovery of a gaping gulf wherein England is like to be swallowed by another French marriage, if the Lord forbid not the bans by letting her see the sin and punishment thereof.

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