An improved Latin grammar, extracted chiefly from Macgowan's 'First lessons in Latin reading'.

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Sherwood, Jones, and Company ... [and 4 others], 1825 - Latin language - 158 pages
 

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Page 180 - XVIII XVII XVI XV XIV XIII XII XI X IX VIII VII VI v IV III p cT W S.
Page 157 - VERSE. 1. HEXAMETER. The Hexameter or heroic verse consists of six feet. Of these the fifth is a dactyle, and the sixth a spondee ; all the rest may be either dactyles or spondees ; as, Ludere I quffi veluUu dumRe lm cala- I mo per- I mst - I gristl.
Page 164 - To these may be subjoined the Figures of Diction, as they are called, which are chiefly used by the poets, though some of them likewise frequently occur in prose. 1. When a letter or syllable is added to the beginning of a word, it is called PROSTHsis ; as gnavus for narus; teluli for tuli.
Page 142 - When the nominatives are of different persons, the verb agrees with the first person in preference to the second, and with the second in preference to the third...
Page 180 - XVI XV XIV XIII XII XI X IX VIII VII VI v IV III J to •3 a r*!
Page 93 - Most Latin verbs may be used impersonally in the passive voice, especially neuter and intransitive verbs, which otherwise have no passive ; as, pugnatur, favetur, curritur, venltur ; from pug-no, to fight ; faveo, to favor ; curro, to run ; venio, to come : Indicative.
Page 18 - Adjectives of the third declension have e or t in the ablative singular : but if the neuter be in e, the ablative has i only. 2. The genitive plural ends in ium, and the neuter of the nominative, accusative, and vocative, in ia : except comparatives, which have urn and a.
Page 99 - Here re is called the increase or crement, and so through all the other cases. The last syllable is never esteemed a crement. Some nouns have a double increase, that is, increase by more syllables than one ; as, iter, itmeris.
Page 131 - Some adverbs of time, place, and quantity, govern the genitive ; as, Pridie ejus diei, The day before that day.
Page 180 - XVIII. XVII. XVI. XV. XIV. XIII. XII. XI. X. IX. VIII. VII. VI. V. IV. III. Prid.

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