Courts of Requests: Their Nature, Utility, and Powers Described, with a Variety of Cases Determined in that of Birmingham

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Pearson and Rollason, 1787 - Courts of first instance - 430 pages
 

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Page 109 - ... birth, not his baptism. We generally suppose a child may be a month older than the date of the register. But in cases where one party wishes to defraud another, it becomes necessary to draw the line with precision. If we strictly adhere to a register, it follows, those children who are not baptised till three or four years old, will not be of age till four or five and twenty ; nay, we have known instances of people being baptised at forty, which would give them a license to do what they often...
Page 423 - ... fpent her evenings at the public with her male companions, and could, like them, fwear with a tolerable grace, get drunk, fmoak tobacco, kifs the girls, and now and then kick a bully. Though fhe pleaded being a wife, fhe had really been a hufband ; for fhe courted a young woman, married her, and they lived together in wedlock, till the young woman .died, which was fome years after, and without iflue. She afterwards, like the people of higher rank, kept a miftrefs, and ran away with her. Forcible...
Page 109 - ... court-day he produced one from the church register. ' Court. — This proof does not come up to the point. What age were you when you were baptised ? ' Defendant. — I cannot tell. ' Court. — A man arrives at maturity twenty-one years after the day of his birth, not his baptism. We generally suppose a child may be a month older than the date of the register. But in cases where one party wishes to defraud another, it becomes necessary to draw the line with precision. If we strictly adhere to...
Page 110 - ... years old, will not be of age till four or five and twenty ; nay, we have known instances of people being baptised at forty, which would give them a license to do what they often do without — cheat the world till threescore. As you cannot ascertain your exact age, we shall set aside your childish plea, and do you the honour of treating you as a man — an honour you would gladly accept in any place but this.
Page 108 - ... club, and, if attacked by sickness, to draw money from the box, and yet, to prevent paying what was their due, shelter yourself under childhood ? ' Defendant. — I have never received anything from the club, consequently I owe nothing to it. ' Court. — So much the better that you never had occasion to demand from the box ; but every member, though he enjoys a series of health, receives a constant benefit from it ; for the very idea of a support in the day of affliction, yields to the mind...
Page 424 - Her wife living peaceably with her all her days, without one complaint of a breach of the marriage covenant, evinced there was no defect. Neither would a girl facrifice her reputation, by becoming a miftrefs to a woman in breeches ; this would be changing the fubftance for the fhadow. Befides, a woman 'receives very little more pleafure in faluting a living woman, than a dead one ; whereas a man, like the figure before the Bench, feemed to receive a pleafure inexpreffible. Her being well verfed in...
Page 109 - The next court-day he produced one from the church register. ' Court. — This proof does not come up to the point. What age were you when you were baptised ? ' Defendant. — I cannot tell. ' Court. — A man arrives at maturity twenty-one years after the day of his birth, not his baptism. We generally suppose a child may be a month older than the date of the register. But in cases where one party wishes to defraud another...
Page 294 - ... and the notes would, like this, be returned, with a proteft for non-payment. The ufe of the tongue is the province of a woman, not the pen ; the firft is a bubble, which begins and ends in air, let it alone, and it hurts nothing ; but the pen, like the black, cloven, lower end of Satan, were it not prevented by power, might deal out deftruction without mercy.
Page 424 - ... before them. Her wife living peaceably with her all her days without one complaint of a breach of the marriage covenant, evinced there was no defect.
Page 108 - ... the stewards of a sick-club sued a member for the arrears of his weekly contribution. He pleaded nonage. ' Court. — Are you married ? ' Defendant. — Yes. ' Court. — And so you are, at the same time, a husband and an infant ! Was it honest in you to enter this club, and, if attacked by sickness, to draw money from the box, and yet, to prevent paying what was their due, shelter yourself under childhood ? ' Defendant. — I have never received anything from the club, consequently I owe nothing...

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