Tours in Upper India, and in Parts of the Himalaya Mountains; with Accounts of the Courts of the Native Princes, &c: By Major Archer, .. In Two Volumes, Volume 1

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Richard Bentley, New Burlington Street, (successor to Henry Colburn), 1833 - India - 356 pages
 

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Page iii - HIGH on a throne of royal state, which far Outshone the wealth of Ormus and of Ind, Or where the gorgeous East with richest hand Showers on her kings barbaric pearl and gold...
Page 144 - Though now seventy-five years of age, she feels disposed to bamboozle the fates, for back to her capital she does not intend to go. She has fine houses at Meerut and at Delhi, and also possesses a garden near Bhurtpore, and a good house within that fort.* She received his Excellency with salutes of cannon and turn-out of troops, and entertained the whole party to breakfast and dinner, which was laid out in tents for the occasion. The above sketch is from one who has known her all his life, and who...
Page 383 - Delhi, and had the narrator pruned his wing to remain upon the earth, and not sought among genii and demons for his agents, a place better adapted to realize all his fictions could not have been conceived, nor a people who would more readily, by their inclinations and dispositions, have prevented his having recourse to any thing for his work but the simple narration of matter-of-fact occurrences. At this visit to Delhi we did not see the King, but we saw the two younger Princes. The youngest but...
Page 78 - The hawk, which was of the long-wing, soaring kind, named a bkyree, proceeded in chase. Aware of his .inability to rise so fast as his quarry, he went away, as if not disposed to come back, but imperceptibly ascending. Having gone far enough, he tacked, and continued to do so until he was above the curlew. These turns which the hawk makes, are very beautiful, and evince great sagacity. In the meantime, the curlew had got so high, as scarcely to be within ken, having also gained a considerable distance...
Page 110 - The preliminaries of etiquette having been satisfactorily adjusted as to the mode of presentation, the Commander-in-chief stipulated that nothing derogatory to his situation or rank should be required ; neither on his own part did he desire more than to be received on the same terms and with the consideration applicable to the Resident. The prospect of a handsome nuzzer or offering operated with the King to facilitate the presentation ; for it is known that by such means he is necessitated to eke...
Page 53 - Mynpooree, (seven miles) : formerly it was of greater extent and importance than at present, which was owing to its being situated on the high road from the Upper Provinces. In the afternoon went to look at a Jain temple, which was erected about forty years ago at the expense of an individual of that creed. It was a neat building with an upper story ; the idol is Boodh, whose worship many learned suppose to have been prior to the Braminical, and...
Page 288 - A similar sacrifice is described by Major Archer as still practised in the mountains of Upper India, which he himself witnessed. " An unfortunate goat," says he, "lean and emaciated, was brought as an offering to the deities ; but so poor in flesh was he that no crow would have waited his death in hopes of a meal from his carcass.
Page 314 - ... benefactions of those whose piety propels them from the farthest extremities of India to visit its holy precincts. The Himalaya are the peculiar abodes of the gods of the Hindoos; the rivers, issuing from the eternal snows, are goddesses, and are sacred in the eyes of all. Shrines of the most holy and awful sanctity are at the fountainheads of the Ganges and Jumna; and on the summit of Kedar Nauth, Cali, that goddess of bloody rites, is supposed to have taken up her residence. One among the numerous...
Page 144 - ... another instance of the very close alliance which subsists between the power and comprehensiveness of the human mind and its weakness. Though now seventy-five years of age, she feels disposed to bamboozle the fates, for back to her capital she does not intend to go. She has fine houses at Meerut and at Delhi, and also possesses a garden near Bhurtpore, and a good house within that fort.* She received his Excellency with salutes of cannon and turn-out of troops, and entertained the whole party...
Page 120 - ... projecting over each other, all fixed by the key-stone at the top. The Cootub was the effect of bigotry and fanaticism, the invariable associates of Moslem invasion and power. The Hindoo temples were destroyed, for many of their relics are perceptible in parts of the Cootub. This fact alone decides the controversy as to the people by whom the pillar was raised. The Hindoos, with perhaps pardonable assumption, claim it to their honour, not being aware of the circumstance above-mentioned, even...

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