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Books Books 1 - 4 of 4 on The hawk, which was of the long-wing, soaring kind, named a bkyree, proceeded in....
" The hawk, which was of the long-wing, soaring kind, named a bkyree, proceeded in chase. Aware of his .inability to rise so fast as his quarry, he went away, as if not disposed to come back, but imperceptibly ascending. Having gone far enough, he tacked,... "
Tours in Upper India, and in Parts of the Himalaya Mountains; with Accounts ... - Page 78
by Edward Archer - 1833 - 356 pages
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The Monthly Review

Books - 1833
...and had not proceeded far when they discovered some curlews feeding in a field. The hawk was put up: The curlew being roused, and seeing its enemies, screamed...very beautiful, and evince great sagacity. In the meantime, the curlew had got so high as scarcely to be within ken, having also gained a considerable...
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The New monthly magazine and universal register. [Continued as] The New ...

1841
...to mount almost perpendicularly. The hawk, which was of the long-wing, soaring kind, named a bkyree, proceeded in chase. Aware of his .inability to rise...very beautiful, and evince great sagacity. In the meantime, the curlew had got so high, as scarcely to be within ken, having also gained a considerable...
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The New Monthly Magazine, Volume 62

Thomas Campbell, Samuel Carter Hall, Edward Bulwer Lytton Baron Lytton, Theodore Edward Hook, Thomas Hood, William Harrison Ainsworth - 1841
...mount; almost perpendicularly. The hawk, which was of the long-wing, soaring kind, named a bkyree, proceeded in chase. Aware of his inability to rise...very beautiful, and evince great sagacity. In the meantime, the curlew had got so high, as scarcely to be within ken, having also gained a considerable...
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The New Sporting Magazine, Volume 5

Hunting - 1833
...longwing, soaring kind, named a bh y ree, proceeded in chase. Aware of his inability to rise so fastas his quarry he went away, as if not disposed to come...but imperceptibly ascending. Having gone far enough be tacked, and continued to do so until he was above the curlew. These turns which the hawk makes are...
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