The Evolution of Cooperation

Front Cover
Basic Books, 2006 - History - 241 pages
5 Reviews
The Evolution of Cooperation provides valuable insights into the age-old question of whether unforced cooperation is ever possible. Widely praised and much-discussed, this classic book explores how cooperation can emerge in a world of self-seeking egoists-whether superpowers, businesses, or individuals-when there is no central authority to police their actions. The problem of cooperation is central to many different fields. Robert Axelrod recounts the famous computer tournaments in which the "cooperative” program Tit for Tat recorded its stunning victories, explains its application to a broad spectrum of subjects, and suggests how readers can both apply cooperative principles to their own lives and teach cooperative principles to others.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
5
4 stars
0
3 stars
0
2 stars
0
1 star
0

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

nm

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This may be one of the most important books of the 20th century. Axlerod has done for ethics what Gailieo did for physics and Mendel did for genetics. There are still many "delimas" to be solved, but this shows the way to move the questions of ethics from debate to experimental science.

Contents

II
3
III
27
IV
55
V
73
VI
88
VII
109
VIII
124
IX
145
X
169
XI
192
XII
206
XIII
216
XIV
223
XV
231
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2006)

Robert Axelrod is Professor of Political Science and Public Policy at the University of Michigan. A MacArthur Prize Fellow, he is a leading expert on game theory, artificial intelligence, evolutionary biology, mathematical modeling, and complexity theory. He lives in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Bibliographic information