The Cornhill Magazine

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William Makepeace Thackeray
Smith, Elder., 1901 - Electronic journals
 

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Page 58 - To one who has been long in city pent, 'Tis very sweet to look into the fair And open face of heaven, — to breathe a prayer Full in the smile of the blue firmament.
Page 620 - ... of man, his far-reaching aims, his short duration. the curtain hung over his futurity, the disappointments of life, the defeat of good, the success of evil, physical pain, mental anguish, the prevalence and intensity of sin, the pervading idolatries, the corruptions, the dreary hopeless irreligion, that condition of the whole race so fearfully yet exactly described in the Apostle's words: "Having no hope and without God in the world...
Page 112 - And it came to pass at the seventh time, that he said, Behold, there ariseth a little cloud out of the sea like a man's hand.
Page 620 - ... the tokens so faint and broken of a superintending design, the blind evolution of what turn out to be great powers or truths, the progress of things as if from unreasoning elements, not towards final causes...
Page 670 - Oh! while along the stream of Time thy name Expanded flies, and gathers all its fame, Say, shall my little bark attendant sail, Pursue the triumph, and partake the gale?
Page 725 - The successors of Charles V. may disdain their brethren of England: but the romance of ' Tom Jones,' that exquisite picture of human manners, will outlive the palace of the Escurial and the Imperial Eagle of Austria.
Page 192 - It will very readily occur, that this uniformity of barrenness can afford very little amusement to the traveller ; that it is easy to sit at home and conceive rocks and heath, and waterfalls ; and that these journeys are useless labours, which neither impregnate the imagination, nor enlarge the understanding.
Page 496 - Dwellers in our native Thebes, behold, this is Oedipus, who knew the famed riddle, and was a man most mighty; on whose fortunes what citizen did not gaze with envy? Behold into what a stormy sea of dread trouble he hath come!
Page 330 - Nothing could be more delightful than the kindness and affection between the brother and the sister, though Lamb was continually taking advantage of her deafness to mystify her with the most singular gravity upon every topic that was started. "Poor Mary!" said he, "she hears all of an epigram but the point.
Page 332 - Erebus, and has the most mocking and lying-in-wait sort of expression conceivable. His mouth is alive with a kind of working and impatient nervousness, and when he has burst forth, as he does constantly, with a particularly successful...

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