Journal of a Route Across India, Through Egypt, to England, in the Latter End of the Year 1817, and the Beginning of 1818

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Page 462 - Created half to rise, and half to fall; Great lord of all things, yet a prey to all ; Sole judge of truth, in endless error hurl'd; The glory, jest, and riddle of the world!
Page 457 - Chateaubriand, but somebody has taken the pains to engrave under it, "//;'etoit pas id," which I was assured is really the fact. It was my wish to have dated some letters I intended for India, from the top of the great pyramid; but I found the Arabs had only brought up my memorandumbook and pencil. " In descending, which I much dreaded, being always affected with giddiness in looking down from a height, I found it extremely easy ; the reason I know not, except my being aware that the alternative...
Page 106 - From the view he has thus necessarily taken of the religions, manners, and customs of so many nations, and from his having observed the number of different modes of addressing and worshipping the Supreme Being, he naturally turned to his own faith with an unprejudiced mind, found it perverted from the religion of the Vedas to a gross idolatry, and was not afraid, though aware of the consequences, to publish to the world, in Bengalee and English, his feelings and opinions on the subject. Of course...
Page 106 - There has never been, to my knowledge, an instance of any Hindoo of condition or caste being converted to our faith. The only conversion of any kind, if it can be called so, that has come within my observation, was that of a high-caste...
Page 107 - Vedas to a gross idolatry, and was not afraid, though aware of the consequences, to publish to the world, in Bengalee and English, his feelings and opinions on the subject. Of course he was fully prepared to meet the host of interested enemies, who, from sordid motives, wished to keep the lower classes in the state of the darkest ignorance.
Page 107 - ... have understood that his family have quitted him ; that he has been declared to have lost caste, and is for the present, as all religious reformers must be for a time, a mark to be scoffed at.
Page 106 - I became well acquainted with him, and admire his talents and acquirements. His eloquence in our language is very great, and I am told he is still more admirable in Arabic and Persian. It is remarkable, that he has studied and thoroughly understands the politics of Europe, but more particularly those of England ; and the last time I was in his company he argued forcibly against a standing army in a free country, and quoted all the arguments brought forward by the Members of the Opposition. I think...
Page 393 - ... favourite symbol as well as the Hindoos; but that of the latter is the deadly cobra capella, and is by analogy placed by them in the hands of Seva, the destroying power, as is represented in the famous trimurti in the cave of Elephanta, in the harbour of Bombay. It is worthy of remark, that the snake used in the Egyptian mythology should be represented with a thick neck, which has never been accounted for. The cobra capella, when in a state of irritability, has a wonderful expansion of the back...
Page 452 - I found this door supported by small stones within 8 inches of the floor, and in consequence of the narrowness of the place it took up the whole of that day and part of the next to raise it sufficiently to afford an entrance; this door is 1 foot 3 inches thick, and, together with the work of the niche, occupies 6 feet...
Page 433 - I had to pass two large wooden figures, like porters, at the door, from the tombs of the Kings of Thebes While at supper, Mr. Belzoni, of whom I had heard so much, made his appearance, and I was greatly struck with his person, being in the Turkish costume. He was the handsomest man I ever saw, was above six feet six inches high, and his commanding figure set off by a long beard. He spoke English perfectly, and the subject which had engrossed our thoughts s* long, that of opening the second pyramid,...

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