The Political Writings of John Dickinson, Esquire: Late President of the State of Delaware, and of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Volume 2

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Bonsal and Niles, 1801 - United States
 

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Page 100 - Because I am not the hand, I am not of the body;" is it therefore not of the body? And if the ear shall say, " Because I am not the eye, I am not of the body;" is it therefore not of the body?
Page 230 - Called upon by your country to defend its invaded rights, you accepted the sacred charge before it had formed alliances, and whilst it was without friends or a government to support you. " You have conducted the great military contest with wisdom and fortitude, invariably regarding the rights of the civil power through all disasters and changes.
Page 284 - Refrain from these men, and let them alone: for if this counsel or this work be of men, it will come to nought: But if it be of God, ye cannot overthrow it; lest haply ye be found even to fight against God.
Page 42 - Lest this declaration should disquiet the minds of our friends and fellow-subjects in any part of the empire, we assure them that we mean not to dissolve that union which has so long and so happily subsisted between us, and which we sincerely wish to see restored.
Page 12 - The political liberty of the subject is a tranquillity of mind arising from the opinion each person has of his safety. In order to have this liberty, it is requisite the government be so constituted as one man need not be afraid of another.
Page 105 - ... there can be but one supreme power which is the legislative, to which all the rest are and must be subordinate, yet, the legislative being only a fiduciary power to act for certain ends, there remains still in the people a supreme power to remove or alter the legislative when they find the legislative act contrary to the trust reposed in them...
Page 130 - I think I see the royal state of boroughs, walking their desolate streets, hanging down their heads under disappointments ; wormed out of all the branches of their old trade, uncertain what hand to turn to ; necessitated to become apprentices to their unkind neighbours ; and yet, after all, finding their trade so fortified by companies, and secured by prescriptions, that they despair of any success therein.
Page 224 - Priam's hoary hairs defiled with gore, Not all my brothers gasping on the shore ; As thine, Andromache ! thy griefs I dread ; I see thee trembling, weeping, captive led...
Page 94 - The fact therefore must be that the individuals themselves, each in his own personal and sovereign right, entered into a compact with each other to produce a government; and this is the only mode in which governments have a right to arise, and the only principle on which they have a right to exist.
Page 363 - The progress of the enormous debts which at present oppress, and will in the long run probably ruin, all the great nations of Europe...

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