The Downing Street years

Front Cover
HarperPerennial, 1995 - Biography & Autobiography - 914 pages
A firsthand account of Thatcher's term as Britain's prime minister discusses her three election victories, the Falklands War, the Miners' Strike, the Brighton Bomb, the Westland Affair, and her relations with other nations and leaders. Reprint. $50,000 ad/promo.

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User Review  - mortensengarth - LibraryThing

the reviewer below, (lunza) is totally right about the laundry list. I went to A, called B, signed on for C on a matter of principle! It could be due to my younger relative age ('83) that i found ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - lunza - LibraryThing

I was kind of disappointed, because it seemed to me like a laundry list of "and then I did this, and then I did that, and then I met this head of state, and then this bloody fool stabbed me in the ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
3
Over the Shop
17
Changing Signals
38
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Margaret Thatcher became Britain's first woman Prime Minister in 1979, a post she held for eleven and a half years. She was leader of the Conservative Party for fifteen years, from 1975 to 1990. She was the only British Prime Minister of the twentieth century to win three consecutive general elections. Her partnership with President Ronald Reagan was the driving force of a conservative revolution that transformed the political landscape of the West, achieved a crushing defeat of Communism, and so brought liberty and prosperity within the grasp of millions who had never known them. Since leaving office, Mrs. Thatcher has written two volumes of memoirs -- "The Downing Street Years" and "The Path to Power". She has traveled extensively in America, Europe and Asia, delivering lectures on international issues and keeping in touch with world leaders. She also plays a continuing role in British political affairs. A

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