The Catena in Marcum: A Byzantine Anthology of Early Commentary on Mark

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William Lamb, William R.S Lamb
BRILL, Apr 19, 2012 - Religion - 510 pages
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The "Catena in Marcum" commonly attributed to Victor of Antioch, is the earliest anthology of patristic commentary on the gospel according to St Mark. Its compilation dates from the end of the fifth century and the beginning of the sixth century. Providing the first extended English translation, this book identifies the range of patristic sources employed by the editors, and the historiographical, literary and dogmatic concerns which informed the editing and compilation of this important text. It provides an invaluable resource for those interested in the history and development of the interpretation of Mark.
 

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Contents

Chapter One Patristic Exegesis and the Theological Interpretation of Scripture
3
Chapter Two The Catena in Marcum
27
Chapter Three Commentary Anthology and the Scholastic Tradition
75
Chapter Four Let the Reader Understand
111
Chapter Five The Discrepancies between the Gospels
141
Chapter Six Who do you say that I am?
163
Chapter Seven Conclusion
199
Part II The Catena in Marcum
211
Chapter 7
305
Chapter 8
313
Chapter 9
327
Chapter 10
351
Chapter 11
373
Chapter 12
385
Chapter 13
397
Chapter 14
413

Chapter Headings for the Gospel according to Mark Chapter Headings for the Gospel according to Mark
213
The Hypothesis Saint Cyril of Alexandria On the Gospel according to Saint Mark
215
The Gospel According to Mark
221
Chapter 2
243
Chapter 3
255
Chapter 4
265
Chapter 5
281
Chapter 6
291
Chapter 15
437
Chapter 16
455
Appendix The Sources of the Catena in Marcum
461
Bibliography
479
Index of Biblical References
493
Index of Modern Authors
503
Index of Subjects
506
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

William R. S. Lamb, is Vice-Principal and Tutor in New Testament Studies, Westcott House, Cambridge and an Affiliated Lecturer, Faculty of Divinity, University of Cambridge.

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