The Second Sex (Vintage Feminism Short Edition)

Front Cover
Random House, Mar 5, 2015 - Philosophy - 144 pages
8 Reviews

Vintage Feminism: classic feminist texts in short form

WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY NATALIE HAYNES

When this book was first published in 1949 it was to outrage and scandal. Never before had the case for female liberty been so forcefully and successfully argued. De Beauvoir’s belief that ‘One is not born, but rather becomes, a woman’ switched on light bulbs in the heads of a generation of women and began a fight for greater equality and economic independence. These pages contain the key passages of the book that changed perceptions of women forever.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bethie-paige - LibraryThing

FINALLY, I finished it. This book seemed to take forever and I'm so glad I finished it. I was pretty much skim reading it by the end of it. It was a really interesting book and that's why I gave it 4 ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Beholderess - LibraryThing

A powerful and groundbreaking book on feminism. To me it's main value lies in defining the relationship between biology and social norms, and how biology definitely influences social norms but in no way excuses them. Read full review

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Selected pages

Contents

Cover
Title Page
Note on the Text
Notes
Biography
Copyright

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About the author (2015)

Simone de Beauvoir was born in Paris in 1908. In 1929 she became the youngest person ever to obtain the agrégation in philosophy at the Sorbonne, placing second to Jean-Paul Sartre. She taught at the lycées at Marseille and Rouen from 1931–1937, and in Paris from 1938–1943. After the war, she emerged as one of the leaders of the existentialist movement, working with Sartre on Les Temps Mordernes. The author of several books including The Mandarins (1957) which was awarded the Prix Goncourt, de Beauvoir was one of the most influential thinkers of her generation. She died in 1986.

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