The Civil Engineer and Architect's Journal, Volume 2

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Published for the proprietor, 1839 - Architecture
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Page 248 - BINGHAM'S ANTIQUITIES OF' THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH. New and Improved Edition, carefully revised, with an enlarged Index. 2 vols. Imp!. 8vo, cloth, I*. 11*. M. 1850 "Bingham is a writer who does equal honour to the English clergy and to the English nation, and whose learning is only to be equalled by his moderation and impartiality."— Quarterly Review.
Page 102 - It happens sometimes that the chloride of silver is disposed to darken of itself, without any exposure to light: this shows that the attempt to give it sensibility has been carried too far. The object is, to approach to this condition as near as possible without reaching it ; so that the substance may be in a state ready to yield to the slightest extraneous force...
Page 99 - When the solar rays are passed through a print and thrown upon prepared paper, the unshaded parts are slowly copied; but the lights transmitted by the shaded parts are seldom so definite as to form a distinct resemblance of them by producing different intensities of colour. " The images formed by means of a camera obscura have been found to be too faint to produce, in any moderate time, an effect upon the nitrate of silver.
Page 9 - ... inferior branch of art in which the imagination appears to have no concern. It does not, however, acquire the name of a polite and liberal art from its usefulness, or administering to our wants or necessities, but from some higher principle: we are sure that in the hands of a man of genius it is capable of inspiring sentiment, and of filling the mind with great and sublime ideas.
Page 102 - ... light : this shows that the attempt to give it sensibility has been carried too far. The object is to approach to this condition as near as possible without reaching it, so that the substance may be in a state ready to yield to the slightest extraneous force, such as the feeble impact of the violet rays when much attenuated.
Page 99 - After the colour has been once fixed on the leather or paper, it cannot be removed by the application of water, or water and soap, and it is in a high degree permanent. The copy of a painting or the profile, immediately after being taken, must be kept in an obscure place ; it may, indeed, be examined in the shade> but in this case the exposure should be only for a few minutes ; by the Light of candles or lamps, as commonly employed, it is not sensibly affected.
Page 100 - But in truth the difficulty is in both cases the same. The one of these takes no more time to execute than the other ; for the object which would take the most skilful artist days or weeks of labour to trace or to copy, is effected by the boundless powers of natural chemistry in the space of a few seconds.
Page 1 - But the tenant is to take care that the premises do not suffer more than the operation of time and nature would effect; he is bound by seasonable applications of labour to keep the house as nearly as possible in the same condition as when it was demised.
Page 100 - ... these more especially I have made numerous experiments; the other I have comparatively little used, because it appears to require more nicety in the management. It is, however, equal, if not superior, to the first in brilliancy of effect. This chemical change, which I call the preserving process, is far more effectual than could have been anticipated. The paper, which had previously been so sensitive to light, becomes completely insensible to it, insomuch that I am able to show the Society specimens...
Page 56 - I believe they will be materially increased, but my great object would be in any possible way to render each part capable of improvement, and to remove what appears an obstacle to any great progress in such a very important point as the diameter of the wheels upon which the resistance which governs the cost of transport and the speed that may be obtained so materially depends.

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