Belgravia, a London magazine, conducted by M.E. Braddon

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1866 - 2 pages
 

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Page 288 - Than that a child, more than all other gifts That Earth can offer to declining man, Brings hope with it, and forward-looking thoughts, And stirrings of inquietude, when they By tendency of nature needs must fail.
Page 73 - The imagination of a boy is healthy, and the mature imagination of a man is healthy ; but there is a space of life between, in which the soul is in a ferment, the character undecided, the way of life •uncertain, the ambition thick-sighted...
Page 195 - written at three, four, and five o'clock (in the morning) by an octogenary pen ; a heart (as Mrs. Lee says) twenty-six years old, and as HLP feels it to be, all your own.
Page 90 - Burns's manner was the effect produced upon him by a print of Bunbury's, representing a soldier lying dead on the snow, his dog sitting in misery on one side — on the other, his widow, with a child in her arms. These lines were written beneath: — • * Cold on Canadian hills, or Minden's plain, Perhaps that parent wept her soldier slain — Bent o'er her babe, her eye dissolved in dew.
Page 342 - Tours, Travels, Essays, too, I wist, And Sermons, to thy mill bring grist ; And then thou hast the " Navy List,
Page 73 - twixt boy and youth, When thought is speech, and speech is truth.
Page 452 - But, for the general award of love, The little sweet doth kill much bitterness ; Though Dido silent is in under-grove, And Isabella's was a great distress, Though young Lorenzo in warm Indian clove Was not embalm'd, this truth is not the less — Even bees, the little almsmen of spring -bowers, Know there is richest juice in poison-flowers.
Page 186 - cried Mrs Thrale ; ' pray who is she ? ' ' Oh, a fine character, madam ! She was habitually a slut and a drunkard, and occasionally a thief and a harlot.
Page 186 - I could not help expressing my amazement at his universal readiness upon all subjects, and Mrs. Thrale said to him, "Sir, Miss Burney wonders at your patience with such stuff; but I tell her you are used to me, for I believe I torment you with more foolish questions than anybody else dares do." "No, madam," said he, "you don't torment me; -you tease me, indeed, sometimes." "Ay, so I do, Dr. Johnson, and I wonder you bear with my nonsense.
Page 87 - ... from it in the afternoon; here's a rogue, dog, here's conscience and honesty ; this is your wit now, this is the morality of your wits ! You are a wit, and have been a beau, and may be a—- why sirrah, is it not here under hand and seal — can you deny it ? VAL.

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