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and to exchange one parting look with many a dear connexion, who had mingled secretly with the crowd below. The enemy on this day were liberal of their ammunition, sending into the town a number of bombs much larger than those fired on the five preceding days : but those missiles appeared to have lost the power of intimidating even the weakest, where death in such variety of terrible forms continually crossed their path. Indeed, it became with many a matter of cool calculation, or a topic of desperate levity, in what manner they were likely to quit the world before another sun should set or rise. When, therefore, it was known that a movement had commenced among their friends without, none were deterred from hastening to the walls, who had power yet left to mount them.

The lady of M‘Alister, supported by Bryan and Magrath, was among the number who succeeded in ascending those impregnable ramparts ; and melancholy beyond description was the scene displayed. Hundreds bad already died upon the spot, and now, when the welcome sound of home saluted their ears, many were seen rising eagerly from the earth, only to fall again in helpless debility, beneath the overpowering burden of famine and disease, Of these, some in the wild eagerness of that hope which will cling even to a shadow, essayed to crawl along on their hands and feet; while others even rolled in the direction to which their hearts pointed. Many in

moek submission to the divine will gave over the attempt, after a faint struggle or two; and greeting with audible blessings the departing footsteps of their comrades, resigned themselves to the approach of a lingering death where they lay. And there were partings, characterized by such ebullitions of violent feelings as wrung the hearts of many whose overflowing portion of private sorrow might have been expected to render them heedless of all besides : such a spectacle was displayed immediately under the spot where the lady of M‘Alister bent to survey the scene.

A woman of interesting appearance, the remains of whose garments bespoke that gentility to which her language also bore witness, was compelled to give over her feeble attempts at rising from a rude couch, spread by some compassionate hands for her accommodation. A girl, apparently about eighteen years old, stood near, gazing in silent anguish on her parent, while three children of tender age were using all their artless rhetoric to rouse the sufferer into renewed exertions.

.“ We are going home, mother dear,” said the elder of the three; “and you will be well when once you see our pretty home again.”

“ Ah, mother,” added a little boy, somewhat younger, “the smell of the roses, and the sweet honeysuckle over the porch, will be so nice after this place. The gunpowder and the noise of these

naughty men, have made you sick-home will make you well again.”

“I want to go home,” sobbed out a little creature, who clung to her mother's neck, attempting to raise her.

“ Kathleen will take you home, my darlings,” answered the poor mother.

“But you must come too."

“ Yes, I shall go home, my children; but not to the one you are returning to.” .“ Then we'll go with you, dear mother, to the other home,” said the little boy.

“No, not now, Robert: but if you love the Lord and pray to be among the Lambs of the Good Shepherd, you will come to me in that pleasant home where I am to enter first.” :

« Oh then you are going to die, mother! You must not die-you must not leave us ;” and with cries of grief and terror each little voice repeated the words ; adding such entreaties, mingled with terms of endearment and tender reproach, that the parent's natural feelings seemed for a while to overpower even the working of divine grace in her soul. She groaned with anguish of spirit, and exclaimed, “Oh, Kathleen, take them hence-leave me, leave me!”

Kathleen bent over her with an aspect of tearless despair, and in a smothered voice, answered, “ Mother, I cannot.”

“ You must,” said a voice from the wall, so deep, so unearthly in its tone, that all who heard it turned involuntarily towards the speaker.

Kathleen started : the mother raised her eyes to the spot, clasping her hands, but neither uttered a word. The children renewed their lamentations, mingling the name of father with that of mother ; until Kathleen, evidently impelled to a renewed effort, stooped down to fold her parent in a long, a fervent embrace, and then raising herself, proceeded to disengage her from the arms of the children, to whom she spoke in an earnest manner, but too low to be heard by any others. Her words seemed to produce the desired effect; for the little ones checked their tears, and in turn kissed their mother, each whispering some injunction in her ear, while she held them close, and seemed to experience the rending of a heart-string as each soft lip was withdrawn from her face. They then surrounded their sister; and the girls, gathering up their garments, displayed the scars that had marked their tender ancles : ; while the boy's feet, without shoes, shrank from the rough stones, with which they came in contact as he moved away. It was with unspeakable thankfulness that the weeping lookers-on beheld a pair of shoes suited to his size Aung from the ramparts just in his path ; which the little fellow immeđiately put on, jumping with delight at the valuable acquisition. Kathleen turned round-she appeared doubly glad of the excuse so to do; and raising first her arms and eyes

to heaven, she fixed an intent gaze upon the walls : she then bowed her head, clenched her hånds in unutterable agony, and with one more hurried glance at her dying mother, she buried herself and the children amid the departing crowd.

All this was clearly comprehended by the spectators on the wall; and deep indeed was the sympathy excited for the father, who beheld his lovely and delicate children thus driven from beneath his eye, to seek a home, where no protection, beyond that of the bare paternal roof, awaited them; while the partner of his sorrow lay expiring, nor dared by one glance of recognition to hazard the discovery of his having been admitted into the garrison. He stood, his elbows resting on the outer wall, and his face entirely concealed upon his hands. There was no visible sign of what was raging within, save the short and violent gasping of his breath; nor did those who immediately surrounded bim venture to break the silence, which spoke more than audible complaints could have expressed. Bryan had beheld the whole scene with 'feelings unusually excited ; for, as the venerable forms of Basil and Shane had receded from his view, until they became lost in the 'promiscuous company around them, every wound recently inflicted on his affectionate heart, bled anew under the sense of irreparable loss, rendering him more keenly alive to the sufferings of others. Besides, the objects most dear to him, his mother,

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