Jura Anglorum: The Rights of Englishmen. By Francis Plowden, ...

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E. and R. Brooke, 1792 - Constitutional law - 620 pages
 

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Page 486 - ... an infringement or privation of the civil rights which belong to individuals, considered merely as individuals; public wrongs, or crimes and misdemeanors, are a breach and violation of the public rights and duties due to the whole community, considered as a community, in its social aggregate capacity.
Page 34 - MEN being, as has been said, by nature all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this estate, and subjected to the political power of another, -without his own consent.
Page 504 - Mr. Burke talks about what he calls an hereditary crown, as if it were some production of Nature ; or as if, like Time, it had a power to operate, not only independently, but in spite of man ; or as if it were a thing or a subject universally consented to. Alas ! it has none of those properties, but is the reverse of them all.
Page 18 - To understand political power right and derive it from its original, we must consider what state all men are naturally in, and that is a state of perfect freedom to order their actions and dispose of their possessions and persons as they think fit, within the bounds of the law of nature, without asking leave or depending upon the will of any other man.
Page 60 - For rulers are not a terror to good works, but to the evil. Wilt thou then not be afraid of the power ? Do that which is good, and thou shalt have praise of the same.
Page 57 - Thus the law of nature stands as an eternal rule to all men, legislators as well as others. The rules that they make for other men's actions must, as well as their own, and other men's actions be conformable to the law of nature...
Page 165 - I hope are sufficient to establish the throne of our great restorer, our present king William; to make good his title in the consent of the people ; which being the only one of all lawful governments, he has more fully and clearly than any prince in Christendom ; and to justify to the world the people of England, whose love of their just and natural rights, with their resolution to preserve them, saved the nation when it was on the very brink of slavery and ruin.
Page 26 - Every history of the Creation, and every traditionary account. whether from the lettered or unlettered world. however they may vary in their opinion or belief of certain particulars. all agree in establishing one point. the unity of man: by which I mean that men are all of one degree. and consequently that all men are born equal. and with equal natural rights.
Page 35 - For, when any number of men have, by the consent of every individual, made a community, they have thereby made that community one body, with a power to act as one body, which is only by the will and determination of the majority.
Page 35 - ... by agreeing with other men to join and unite into a community for their comfortable, safe, and peaceable living one amongst another, in a secure enjoyment of their properties, and a greater security against any that are not of it. This any number of men may do, because it injures not the freedom of the rest; they are left as they were in the liberty of the state of nature.

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