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dence. For an Infance, fee Note 17.

ratioribus

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(2) It would be endless to fpecify the various Species of Infests, that have their Generation in the Waters, And

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are always laid up with great Care, and in good Order. And also, 2. where proper and füfficient Food is. 3. That in their Nympha-State in the Waters, they have Parts proper for Food and Motion; and in many or most of them, very different from what they have in their Mature State, a manifeft Argument of the Čreator's Wisdom and Provi(3) As seigneur Redi was one of the firft that made it his Bufiness to difcard Anomalous Generation, fo he tryed more Experiments relating to the Vermination of Serpents, Flesh, Fish, putrified Vegetables, and in fhort, whatever was commonly known to be the Nurfery of Maggots, more I fay probably, than any one hath done fince. And in all his Observations, he confiantly found the Maggots, to turn to Aurelit, and these into Flies. But then, faith he, Dubitare pi, utrum 'omne hoc vermium in carne genus, ex folo Muscarum femine, an ex ipsis putrefastis carnibus oriretur, tantoque magis confirmabar in hoc i meo dubio, quanto in omnibus, gene

fæpius videram, in carnibus, antequam verminare i ciferent, refediffe effim speciei Muse4s, cujus propagò postea naftebatur. Upon this he tells us, hé put Fish, Flesh, src. into Pots, which he covered close from the Flies with Paper, and afterwards (for the free Air fake) with Lawn, whilft other Pots were left" open, with fuch like

Flesh, &c. in them; that the Flies were very eager to get

into the covered Pots; and that they produced not one

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|- |- |- - - - - he

to whom the Fruits (4) or Leaves of Vegetables are . . . - - , ' Food,

he taxeth with them. So that either he means by Culex, fome Fly that we call not by the Name of Gnat ; or elfe their Gnats in Italy, vary in their Generation from ours in England. For among above 3o, , near 4o diftinct Species of Gnats that I have observed about the Place where. Í live, I never found any to lay their Eggs in Flesh, Fish, ére: but the largefi Sort called by Aldrovand, Culicet maximi, by Swammerdam, Tipule terrestres, lay their :::::::: ċrs. : Grafs ; one of the larger middle Šort, in dead Beer, Yeaft, &c. lying ön the Tops, or in the Leaks of Beer. Barrels, stre. and all the reft (as: as ever I have observed), lay and hatch in the waters, as in Note 17. - - - The Generation of the Second of these being akin to fome of the :": and a little cut of the way, may deferve a Place here: . This Gnat lays its Eggs commonly in dead Beer, Ge. as I faid, and probably in Vinegar, and other fuch Liquors. Sometime after which, the Maggots are so numerous. that the whole Liquor ftirreth as if it was alive ; being full of Maggots, fome larger; fome smaller; the larger are the Offspring of our Gnat, the fmaller, of a small dark coloured Fly tehding to reddish ; frequent in Cellars, and such obscure Places. All the Maggots turn to Aurelia, the larger of which, of a Tan-Colour, turn to our Gnat. This Gnat is of the unarmed Kind, having no Spear in its Mouth. Its Head is larger than of the common Gnats, a longer Neck, short jointed Antenna, fported wings reaching beyond its flender Alva ; it is, throughout of a brown Colour, tending to red, especially in the Female: The :::::::: between the Male and Female, is (as in other Gnats, yea, moft Infects) the Male is less than the Female, and hath a #:: Belly, and its Podex not foi fharp as the Female's is. . . . . . . . . . . - . (4) The Infects that infest Fruits, are either of the IchneumonFly kind, or Phalene. Plums, Peấfe, Nuts, Sc. produce fome orother Ichneumon-Fly. That generated in the Plum is black of a middle fize, its Body near i Inch long, its Tail not much leß, confifting of 3 Bristles, wherewith it conveys its Eggs into Fruits: Its Antenne, or Horns long, flender, recurved; its Belly longish, tapering finall towards the Thorax ; Legs reddish; Wings membranaceous, thin and transparent, in number 4, which is one Characterifick of the Ichnenmin-Fly.

The

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Food, are accordingly repofited, fome in this Fruit, : : : (5), fome on that "":

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ots inclining to a dirty Red ) all but about a third Part at the End of the Wings, which is not grey, but brown, elegantly ftriped with wavey Lines of a Gold-colour, as if gilt ; Its Head is small, with a Tuft of whitish-brown in the #:: Antenne fmooth, moderately long. The Aurelia of

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time they require for their Generation out of Boxes; but those laid up in August, did not become Moths before fune follow

:, There are many of the Phalenæ and Ichneumon-Fly Tribes, that have their Generation on the Leaves or other Parts of Trees and Shrubs, too many to be here reckoned up. The oak hath many yery beautiful Phalenæ, bred in its convolved Heaves, white, Green, Yellow, Brown fpotted _prettily, and neatly åappie, and many more befides; and its Buds afford a Place for Cafes, and Balls of various Sorts, as fhall be shewn hereafter; its Leaves expanded, minifter to the Germination of globular, and other sphæroidal Balls, and fat Thecæ, fome like its, fome like Buttons excavated in the Middle, and divers other fuch like Repofitories, all belonging to the Ichneunon-Fly kind. And not only the Oak, but the Maple alfo, the White-thorn, the Briar, Privet, and indeed almoft every Tree, and shrub. ' ' .. ::" as Trees ană Shrubs, fo Plants have their peculiar Infects. The White-Butterfly lays its voracious Offspring.

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fomé on another, and another; but constantly the fame Family on the fame Tree, or Plant, the moft agreeable to that Family. And as for others that require a confiant and greater Degree of Warmth, they are accordingly provided by the Parent-Ánimal with fome Place in or about the Body of other Animals ; fome in the Feathers of Birds (7); fome in the Hair of Beafts (8); fome :: - , ' ' -; , - - ... ~ :

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in the very Scales of Fishes (9); fome in the

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ọm it. - - : -s - . . . ... (11) In the Backs of cows in the Summer-Months, there are : gots generated, which in Essex we call Wornils: Which are firft only a small Knot in the Skin, and I suppose no other thanan Egg laid there by fome Infect. By degrees these Knots grow bigger, and contain in them a Maggot lying in a puruient Matter: they grow to be as large as the End of one’s Finger, and may be fqueezed out ata Hole they have always open : they are round and rough, and of a dirty White... With my utmost Endeavours and Vigilance, I could never discover the Animal they turn into; but as they are fomewhat like, fo maybe the fame as those in the Note before. . . ., , < In Férfia there are very longflender Worms, bred in the Legs, and other Parts of Mens Bodies, 6 or 7 Yards long. In Philos. Tranf. Mr. Dent and Mr. Lewis relate divers Examples of Worms taken out of the Tongue, Gums, N: * , - 3I}

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