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the very Bowels (12); and inmost Receffès : - - - - the

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the Bodies of Man and other Creatures (1 : * - - - An

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And as for others to whom none of thefe Methods are proper, but make themfelves Nefts by Perforations in the Earth, in Wood, or Combs they build, or fuch like Ways, 'tis admirable to fès with what Labour and Care they carry in, and feal up Provisions, that ferve both for the Produċti- “ ’ OIR - : - - - - - } Animals Bodies, may be nothing elfe. Lowth. ib. p. 12bi Nay, more than all this: In Dr. Bern. Verzascha’s 6th Observa, tion, there are divers Infiances of Worms bred in the Brain of Man. One, a Patient of his, troubled with a violent Headach, and an itching about the Noftrils, and frequent Sneezing; who, with the Ufe of a sneezing-Powder, voided a worm, with a great deal of Snot from his Nofe. A like Infance he gives from Bartholine, of a worm volded from the Nose of 0. w. which he gueffeth was the famous Olaus Wormius : Another, from a Country Woman of Dietmarsh; and others in Tulpias, F. Ħik: danus, Schenckins, &c. These worms he thinks are undoubteda ly bred in the Brain : But what way they can come from thence, I can't tell. Wherefore I rather think, they are fuch Worms as are mentioned in Note Io, and even that Worm that was astually found in the Brain of the Paris-Girl (when epened) I guess might be laid in the Lamine of the Noftrils, by fome, of the Ichneumon, or other Infećt Kind, and might gnaw its way into the Brain, through the os cribriforme. Of this he tells us from Bartholine, rindem cum tabiảa obiilset, fatin aperto cranio præsentes Medici totam cerebelli fubstantiam, qua ad dextrum vergit, a reliquo corpore fejuntam, nigraque tunica involutam deprehenderunt : hæc tunica rupta, latentem Vermen vivum, & pilosum, duobus punstis splendidis loco oculorum prodidit, ejusdem fere molis cum reliqua Cerebri portione, qui duarum borarum spacio supervixit, B. Verzas. Obf. Medicæ, p. 16. Hildanus tells us fuch another Story, viz. Filius Theod. anff der Roulen, Avunculi mei, diuturno vexabatur dolore capitis.–Deinde febricula, & fernutatione exorta, ruptus est Abscesas circa os cibrosum.–– ES Vermis prorepfit. By his Figure of it, the Maggot was an Inch long, and full of Bristles. Fabri Hildan. Cent. I. Obf. - ----. . . . . - - ... Gatenus Wierus (Physician to the Princ. Jul. & Cleve) he faith, told him, that he had, at divers Times, found Worms ::Lu° in Perfons he had opened at Dufeldorp. Id. 19. GODI« 6O.

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on of their Young, as also for their Food and Nurture when produced (14). . . . . . . . . , : The other Piece of remarkable Art and Care about the Production of their Young, is their Curi: ofity and Neatnefs in repofiting their Eggs, and in their Nidification. . . . . . . - |

As to the first of which, we may observe that great Curiofity, and nice Order is generally obferved by them in this Matter. You shall always fee their Eggs laid carefully and commodiously up (15). When upon the Leaves of Vegetables, or other Material on Land, always glued thereori with Care, with one certain End lowermoft, and with handfom juxta-Pofitions (16). Or if in the Waters, in neat, and beautiful Rows oftentimes; in that Spermatick, Gelatine Matter, in whichthey are repofited, and that Matter carefully tied and faftned in the Waters, to prevent its Diffipation (17), or if made to float, fo carefully spread and

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(14) See before Book 4. Chap. 13. Note 2. (15) Some Infests lay up their Eggs in Clufters, as in Holes of Flesh, and fuch Places, where it is necessary they should be crowded together; which, no question, prevents their being :: dried upin dry Places, and promotes their hatching. ut, (16) As for fuch as are not to be cluftered up, great Order is used. I have feen upon the Poft and Sides of Windows, little round Eggs refembling fmall Pearl, which produced small hairy Caterpillers, that were very neatly and orderly laid. And to name no more, the White Butterfly lays its neat Eggs on the Cabbage Leaves in good order, always gluing one certain End of the Egg to the Leaf. I call them neat Eggs, because if we view them in a Microscope, we shall find them very curioufly furrowed, and handfomely made and adorned. : -, . , ! * ", (17) By reafon it would be éndlefs to specify the various Generation of Infests in the Water, I shall therefore (because it is little obferved) take Pliny’s Infance of the Gnat , a mean and contemned Animal, but a notable Infiance of Nature’s Work, as he faith, |- Thë

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9, and io; and in fome transverfly, as Fig.8. ; , , :.: When the Eggs are by the Heat of the Sun, and warmth of the Seafon Thatched into small Maggots, these Maggots. descend to the bottom, and by means of fome of the gelafine Mater of the spawn (which they take long with them) they fick to Stones, and other Bodies at the bottom, and there make themselves_little Cafes or Cells, which they creep into, and out of at Pleasure,, until they are arrived to a more mature Nypha:State, and, can fwim about here and there, to feek for what Food they have occafion for: at which time, they are a kind of i Red-worms, above half an Inch long: as in Fig. II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... Thus far this mean Infect is a good Instance of the di: vine Providence towards it. But if we farther confider, and compare the three States it undergoes after it is hatched, we fhall find yet greater Signals of the Creator’s Management, even in these meanet of Creatures. The three States, i mean, are its Nympha-Vermiculàr State, its Aurelia, and Matúre-State, all as different as to Shape and Accoutrements, as if the Infect was three different Animals. . In its _Vermicular-State, it is a Red-Maggot, as I faid, and hathi a Mouth and other Parts accommodated to Food : In its Aurelia-State it hath no fuch Parts, becaufe it then subfifts without Food; but in its Mature, Gnat-State, it, hath a curious well-made Spear, to wound, and fuck the Blood of ọther Animals. In its Vermicular-State, it hath a long worm-like Body, and fomething ahalogous to Fins or Feathers, flanding érett near its Tail, and running parallel withi : : :ens of which :fi: :w::::::::::: abled to swim about by Curvations, or flapping its Body, fide-ways this way and that, as in Fig. 12: „ , ... But in its Aurelia-State, it hath a quite different Body; with a club-Head ( in which the Head, Thorax, and Wings of the Gnat are inclosed ) a flender Alvus, and a neát finy-Tai; fianding át right Angles with the Body, quite contrary to what it was beforé ; by which means, înfteảd of easy flapping fide-ways, it swims by rapid, brisk Jirks, the quite contrary way: as is in fome measure represented in Fig. i 3. But when it becomes : Gnat, no finny Tail, no Club-Head, but allis made in the mo accurate manner for Flight and Motion in the Air, as before i was for the waters: - c : :#

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