Annual Register, Volume 47

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Edmund Burke
1807 - History
 

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Page 729 - Nor was it uninteresting to the world, that an experiment should be fairly and fully made, whether freedom of discussion, unaided by power, is not sufficient for the propagation and protection of truth? Whether a government, conducting itself in the true spirit of its constitution, with zeal and purity, and doing no act which it would be unwilling the whole world should witness, can be written down by falsehood and defamation?
Page 905 - For this reason, and for no other, namely, that when we come to inspect the watch, we perceive - what we could not discover in the stone - that its several parts are framed and put together for a purpose...
Page 728 - Now reduced within limits too narrow for the hunter's state, humanity enjoins us to teach them agriculture and the domestic arts ; to encourage them to that industry which alone can enable them to maintain their place in existence, and to prepare them in time for that state of society which to bodily comforts adds the improvement of the mind and morals.
Page 600 - ... ships, vessels and goods, that are or shall be taken, and to hear and determine the same ; and, according to the course of Admiralty, and the law of nations...
Page 908 - ... intelligible mechanism by which it was carried on, he would perceive in this new observation nothing but an additional reason for doing what he had already done— for referring the construction of the watch to design and to supreme art. If that construction without this property, or, which is the same thing, before this property had been noticed, proved intention and art to have been employed about it, still more strong would the proof appear when he came to the knowledge of this further property,...
Page 908 - The first effect would be to increase his admiration of the contrivance, and his conviction of the consummate skill of the contriver. Whether he regarded the object of the contrivance, the distinct apparatus, the intricate, yet in many parts intelligible, mechanism by which it was carried on, he would perceive in this new observation nothing but an additional reason for doing what he had already done — for referring the construction of the watch to design, and to supreme art.
Page 727 - I know that the acquisition of Louisiana has been disapproved by some from a candid apprehension that the enlargement of our territory would endanger its union. But who can limit the extent to which the federative principle may operate effectively ? The larger our association, the less will it be shaken by local passions...
Page 728 - ... they are combated by the habits of their bodies, prejudices of their minds, ignorance, pride, and the influence of interested and crafty individuals among them who feel themselves something in the present order of things and fear to become nothing in any other. These persons inculcate a sanctimonious reverence for the customs of their ancestors; that whatsoever they did must be done through all time; that reason is a false guide, and to advance under its counsel in their physical, moral, or political...
Page 907 - A law presupposes an agent ; for it is only the mode, according .to which an agent proceeds : it implies a power ; for it is the order, according to which that power acts. Without this agent, without this power, which are both distinct from itself, the hue does nothing, is nothing. The expression, " the law of metallic nature...
Page 534 - I immediately stood towards the Enemy with the Squadron, making the needful signals for Battle in the closest order ; and, on closing with them, I made the signal for attacking their centre. When I had reached their rear, I tacked the Squadron in succession ; this brought us close up under their lee, and when our headmost Ships reached their centre the Enemy were tacking in succession ; this obliged me to make again the same manoeuvre, by which I brought on an action, which lasted upwards of four...

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