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Books Books 1 - 10 of 13 on Regions like this, which have come down to us rude and untouched from the beginning....
" Regions like this, which have come down to us rude and untouched from the beginning of time, fill the mind with grand conceptions, far beyond the efforts of art and cultivation. Impressed by such views of nature, our ancestors worshipped the God of nature... "
Dartmoor, a descriptive poem, with notes by W. Burt - Page 108
by Nicholas Toms Carrington - 1826
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The Critical Review: Or, Annals of Literature, Volume 34

Tobias George Smollett - English literature - 1802
...statements of an obscure writer. When, in addition to the above remarks, he informs us that " these regions have come down to us rude and untouched from the beginning of time;" what other idea can be excited than that of sterility and desolation? What opinion can we form on the...
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The Critical Review: Or, Annals of Literature

English literature - 1802
...an obscure writer. When, in addition to the above remarks, he informs us that " these region&?have come down to us rude and untouched from the beginning of time;" what other idea can be excited than that of sterility and desolation ? What opinion can we form on...
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The Eclectic Review, Volume 25

Samuel Greatheed, Daniel Parken, Theophilus Williams, Thomas Price, Josiah Conder, William Hendry Stowell, Jonathan Edwards Ryland, Edwin Paxton Hood - 1826
...like this,' says the Rev. Mr. Gilpin, speaking of the kindred scenery of the great Wiltshire Plain, ' which have come down to us rude and untouched ' from the beginning of time, fill the mind with grand concep' tions far beyond the efforts of art and cultivation.1 To endure a residence in such savage...
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The Eclectic review. vol. 1-New [8th]

1826
...like this,' says the Rev. Mr. Gilpin, speaking of the kindred scenery of the great Wiltshire Plain, ' which -have come down to us rude and untouched ' from the beginning of time, fill the mind with grand concep' tious far beyond the efforts of art and cultivation.' To endure a residence :in such savage...
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The collected poems of ... N.T. Carrington, ed. by H.E. Carrington

Nicholas Toms Carrington - 1834
...several spots near Plymouth. The almost total absence of trees and dwellings are striking features. , "There is on Dartmoor," says the Rev. TP Jones, "...which gave them the highest notions of eternity." Except the continual murmur of waters, and the hum of insects, of which the lower part of the atmosphere...
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A Perambulation of the Antient and Royal Forest of Dartmoor and the Venville ...

Samuel Rowe - Dartmoor (England) - 1848 - 298 pages
...bounds are laid down at proximate, and nut as posittvefy j ascertained anfl : PERAMBULATION OF DARTMOOR. Regions like this, -which have come down to us rude...conceptions, far beyond the efforts of art and cultivation. GILFIN. ARTMOOR, whilst it forms in itself the most conspicuous and characteristic feature in the physical...
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A Hand-book for Travellers in Devon & Cornwall...

John Murray (Firm) - Cornwall (England : County) - 1851 - 243 pages
...fancies. The word cleave signifies common or uncultivated land, and this of Lustleigh has apparently come down to us "rude and untouched from the beginning of time ;" withal it is so secluded, that were it not for the rocks, which serve the traveller as a landmark,...
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A hand-book for travellers in Devon & Cornwall [by T.C. Paris].

Thomas Clifton Paris, John Murray (publishers.) - 1851
...fancies. The word cleave signifies common or uncultivated land, and this of Lustleigh has apparently come down to us "rude and untouched from the beginning of time ;" withal it is so secluded, that were it not for the rocks, which serve the traveller as a landmark,...
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Devonshire sketches, by Tickler

George Philip R. Pulman - 1869
...Were they not simple sun worshippers, or is not what a writer has written nearer the truth ? — " Regions like this, which have come down to us rude...which gave them the highest notions of eternity." Verily, there is much nonsense talked and written about the idolatry and ignorance of our forefathers,...
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Stonehenge and Its Barrows

William Long - Stonehenge (England) - 1876 - 244 pages
...spring, under one's feet." (p. 9.) from the beginning of time, fill the mind with grand conceptions, fur beyond the efforts of art and cultivation. Impressed...nature, our ancestors worshipped the god of nature, in these boundless scenes, which gave them the highest conceptions of eternity. All the plain, at least...
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