Offbeat Otolaryngology: What They Didn't Teach You in Medical School

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Thieme, 2001 - Medical - 161 pages
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The information you didn't learn in medical school! A marvelous and amusing read...memorable anecdotes...I defy you not to laugh out loud. --ENT News

Want to get a step up on the competition? This is the book for young doctors trying to bluff their way into erudite otolaryngological circles by giving the impression that their ENT education was not wasted. Knowledge of trivia about a particular subject always gives the impression that the holder of this useless information is also privy to other facts which are just too mundane to mention. While everyone in the field may know what Gradenigo's Syndrome is, you will impress your colleagues by knowing just who Gradenigo was!

Learn the fun facts and information you missed in medical school the magic and romance behind acoustic neuroma; madness and anesthesia; famous tracheotomies; the history of nasal polyps; and so much more. Finally, a medical book that makes you laugh! Offbeat Otolarngology is the book you will avidly read at every break, use in speeches, and amuse your friends and colleagues.

 

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Contents

PERSONAL MESSAGE
2
THE GENTLE ART OF BOUGINAGE AND ENDOSCOPY
29
ANAESTHETIC CORRELATES
35
LOTIONS POTIONS AND PREPARATIONS
41
AUDIOLOGY
51
OTOLOGY
73
MILITARY PROWESS WITHIN THE FIELD OF OTOLARYNGOLOGY
85
RHINOLOGY
93
SURGERY OF THE HEAD NECK
99
PROFESSIONAL RIVALRIES
111
THE FRINGES OF OUR SUBJECT INCLUDING THE ROLE OF INVALID
131
EDUCATION AND TRAINING
137
REFERENCES
147
Copyright

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Page 117 - Johnson appeared bustling about, with an ink-horn and pen in his button-hole, like an exciseman, and on being asked what he really considered to be the value of the property which was to be disposed of, answered — ' We are not here to sell a parcel of vats and boilers, but the Potentiality of growing rich beyond the dreams of avarice.
Page 82 - A MAN'S limbs (by which for the present we only understand those members which may be useful to him in fight, and the loss of which alone amounts to mayhem by the common law) are also the gift of the wise Creator, to enable him to protect himself from external injuries in a state of nature.
Page 26 - Konigstein, the ophthalmologist, that he should investigate the question of how far the anesthetizing properties of cocaine were applicable in diseases of the eye. When I returned from my holiday I found that not he, but another of my friends, Carl Koller (now in New York), to whom I had also spoken about cocaine, had made the decisive experiments upon animals' eyes and had demonstrated them at the Ophthalmological Congress at Heidelberg.
Page 26 - Merck some of what was then the little-known alkaloid cocaine and to study its physiological action. While I was in the middle of this work, an opportunity arose for making a journey to visit my fiancee, from whom I had been parted for two years. I hastily wound up my investigation of cocaine and contented myself in my book on the subject with prophesying that further uses for it would soon be found. I suggested, however, to my friend Konigstein, the ophthalmologist, that he should investigate the...
Page 50 - I need scarcely point to the practical lesson which these facts inculcate. Whenever puerperal fever is rife, or when a practitioner has attended any one instance of it, he should use most diligent ablution ; he should even wash his hands with some disinfecting fluid, a weak solution of chlorine for instance : he should avoid going in the same dress to any other of his midwifery patients : in short, he should take all those precautions which, when the danger is understood, common sense will suggest,...
Page 151 - LECTURES ON THE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF PHYSIC. Delivered at King's College, London. A new American, from the last revised and enlarged English edition, with Additions, by D. FRANCIS CONDIE, MD, author of ".A Practical Treatise on the Diseases of Children,
Page 75 - The pipes of the syringe are made small, of silver, to admit of bending them as occasion offers, and for the most part resemble small catheters; they are mounted with a sheep's ureter, the other end of which is fixed to an ivory pipe, which is fitted to a syringe, whereby warm water may be injected; or they will admit to blow into the Eustachian tube, and so force the air into the barrel of the ear, and dilate the tube sufficiently for the discharge of the excrementitious...
Page 95 - I take a silver tube which is neither too broad nor too narrow, and then a brass or steel wire, sufficiently thick, preferably the iron wire from which harpsichords are made. This doubled I place in the tube so that from this wire a loop is made at one end of the tube, by which, used in the nares, I remove the polyp. When the polyp is engaged in the loop, I push the tube to the root of the polyp, and then pull on the metal threads sticking out at the lower part of the tube, and thus I constrict the...
Page 75 - ... syringe, whereby warm water may be injected; or they will admit to blow into the Eustachian tube, and so force the air into the barrel of the ear, and dilate the tube sufficiently for the discharge of the excrementitious matter that may be lodged there.
Page 49 - Now in the manuscript collection of the Rare Book Room of The New York Academy of Medicine (sign: MS 560) . r.

About the author (2001)

Consultant ENT Surgeon, West Middlesex University Hospital, Isleworth, Middlesex, United Kingdom

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