The Burlington: A High-class Monthly Magazine, Volume 3

Front Cover
Helen Mathers
Remington & Company - English literature
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 25 - Where no misgiving is, rely Upon the genial sense of youth : Glad hearts, without reproach or blot; Who do thy work and know it not; Oh!
Page 97 - Of no more subtle master under heaven Than is the maiden passion for a maid, Not only to keep down the base in man, But teach high thought, and amiable words And courtliness, and the desire of fame, And love of truth, and all that makes a man.
Page 212 - There were two men in one city; the one rich, and the other poor. The rich man had exceeding many flocks and herds : but the poor man had nothing, save one little ewe lamb, which he had bought and nourished up: and it grew up together with him, and with his children ; it did eat of his own meat, and drank of his own cup, and lay in his bosom and was unto him as a daughter.
Page 97 - In the Spring a fuller crimson comes upon the Robin's breast ; In the Spring the wanton lapwing gets himself another crest ; In the Spring a livelier iris changes on the burnished dove ; In the Spring a young man's fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love.
Page 166 - Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools, and CHANGED the glory of the uncorruptible God into AN IMAGE made like to corruptible man, and to birds, and fourfooted beasts, and creeping things.
Page 174 - ROOM for the leper ! Room !" And, as he came, The cry pass'd on — " Room for the leper ! Room !" Sunrise was slanting on the city gates Rosy and beautiful, and from the hills The early risen poor were coming in, Duly and cheerfully to their toil, and up Rose the sharp hammer's clink, and the far hum Of moving wheels and multitudes astir, And all that in a city murmur swells — Unheard but by the watcher's weary ear, Aching with night's dull silence, or the sick Hailing the welcome light and sounds...
Page 173 - I hold the world but as the world, Gratiano ; A stage, where every man must play a part, And mine a sad one.
Page 286 - Below the beeches' bough, my love, Where you did never come, An' I don't look to meet ye now, As I do look at hwome. Since you noo mwore be at my zide, In walks in zummer het, I'll goo alwone where mist do ride, Drough trees a-drippen wet : Below the rain-wet bough, my love, Where you did never come, An" I don't grieve to miss ye now, As I do grieve at hwome.
Page 322 - THERE be none of Beauty's daughters With a magic like thee ; And like music on the waters Is thy sweet voice to me : When, as if its sound were causing The charmed ocean's pausing, The waves lie still and gleaming, And the lull'd winds seem dreaming, And the midnight moon is weaving Her bright chain o'er the deep ; Whose breast is gently heaving, As an infant's asleep : So the spirit bows before thee, To listen...
Page 98 - E'en death to die for thee. Thou art my life, my love, my heart, The very eyes of me: And hast command of every part, To live and die for thee.

Bibliographic information