A Manual of the Book of Common Prayer: Showing Its History and Contents. For the Use of Those Studying for Holy Orders, and Others

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Hodder & Stroughton, 1887 - Prayer books - 276 pages
 

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Page 6 - And this food is called among us Evxaprn'a, of which no one is allowed to partake but the man who believes that the things which we teach are true, and who has been washed with the washing that is for the remission of sins and unto regeneration, and who is so living as Christ has enjoined.
Page 30 - Ireland, as therein set forth, to be agreeable to the Word of God ; and in public prayer and administration of the sacraments, I will use the form in the said book prescribed, and none other, except so far as shall be ordered by lawful authority.
Page 35 - Scriptures, or that which is evidently grounded upon the same, and that in such a language and order as is most easy and plain for the understanding, both of the readers and hearers. It is also more commodious, both for the shortness thereof and for the plainness of the order, and for that the rules be few and easy.
Page 5 - There is then brought to the president of the brethren bread and a cup of wine mixed with water; and he taking them, gives praise and glory to the Father of the universe, through the name of the Son and of the Holy Ghost, and offers thanks at considerable length for our being counted worthy to receive these things at His hands. And when he has concluded the prayers and thanksgivings, all the people present express their assent by saying Amen.
Page 6 - And when the president has given thanks, and all the people have expressed their assent, those who are called by us deacons give to each of those present to partake of the bread and wine mixed with water over which the thanksgiving was pronounced, and to those who are absent they carry away a portion.
Page 6 - His word, and from which our blood and flesh by transmutation are nourished, is the flesh and blood of that Jesus who was made flesh. For the apostles, in the memoirs composed by them, which are called Gospels, have thus delivered unto us what was enjoined upon them; that Jesus took bread, and when He had given thanks, said "This do ye in remembrance of me," this is my body;" and that, after the same manner, having taken the cup and given thanks, He said, "This is my blood"; and gave it to them alone.
Page 2 - Adfirmabant autem hanc fuisse summam vel culpae suae vel erroris, quod essent soliti stato die ante lucem convenire carmenque Christo quasi deo dicere secum invicem seque sacramento non in scelus aliquod obstringere, sed ne furta, ne latrocinia, ne adulteria committerent, ne fidem fallerent, ne depositum appellati abnegarent.
Page 257 - I believe in the Holy Ghost the Lord, and Giver of Life, Who proceedeth from the Father and the Son; Who with the Father and the Son together is worshiped and glorified; Who spake by the Prophets.
Page 94 - Pilato, crucifixus, mortuus et sepultus ; descendit ad inferos, tertia die resurrexit a mortuis ; ascendit ad coelos ; sedet ad dexteram Dei Patris omnipotentis ; inde venturus est judicare vivos et mortuos. " Credo in Spiritum sanctum ; sanctam Ecclesiam catholicam ; Sanctorum communionem ; remissionem peccatorum ; carnis resurrectionem, vitam aeternam. Amen b." k Paroissien Romain, complct en Latin. Paris, Le Clerc ct Cie, 1860. The version of the Apostles...
Page 6 - For not as common bread and common drink do we receive these; but in like manner as Jesus Christ our Saviour, having been made flesh by the Word of God, had both flesh and blood for our salvation, so likewise have we been taught that the food which is blessed by the prayer of His word, and from which our blood and flesh by transmutation are nourished, is the flesh and blood of that Jesus who was made flesh.

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