Poems, Volume 1

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Whittingham, 1817
 

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Page 221 - Where they did all get in ; Six precious souls, and all agog To dash through thick and thin. Smack went the whip, round went the wheels, Were never folks so glad ; The stones did "rattle underneath, As if Cheapside were mad.
Page 172 - Solitude! where are the charms That sages have seen in thy face? Better dwell in the midst of alarms, Than reign in this horrible place. 1 am out of humanity's reach, I must finish my journey alone, Never hear the sweet music of speech; I start at the sound of my own. The beasts that roam over the plain My form with indifference see; They are so unacquainted with man, Their tameness is shocking to me.
Page 229 - Bent upon pleasure, heedless of its end. But he, who knew what human hearts would prove, How slow to learn the dictates of his love, That hard by nature, and of stubborn will, A life of ease would make them harder still, In pity to the souls his grace designed To rescue from the rums of mankind, Called for a cloud to darken all their years, And said, ' Go, spend them in the vale of tears.
Page 228 - Stop thief! stop thief! — a highwayman! Not one of them was mute; And all and each that passed that way Did join in the pursuit. And now the turnpike gates again Flew open in short space; The toll-men thinking as before That Gilpin rode a race.
Page 236 - O LORD, my best desire fulfil, And help me to resign Life, health, and comfort, to thy will, And make thy pleasure mine. 2 Why should I shrink at thy command, Whose love forbids my fears ? Or tremble at the gracious hand That wipes away my tears...
Page 172 - I AM monarch of all I survey, My right there is none to dispute ; From the centre all round to the sea I am lord of the fowl and the brute.
Page 210 - And the scene, where his melody charm'd me before, Resounds with his sweet-flowing ditty no more. My fugitive years are all hasting away, And I must ere long lie as lowly as they, With a turf on my breast, and a stone at my head, Ere another such grove shall arise in its stead.
Page 178 - On the whole it appears, and my argument shows With a reasoning the court will never condemn, That the spectacles plainly were made for the Nose, And the Nose was as plainly intended for them.
Page 227 - And thus unto the youth she said, That drove them to the Bell, This shall be yours when you bring back My husband safe and well.
Page 223 - Fair and softly," John he cried, But John he cried in vain, That trot became a gallop soon In spite of curb and rein.

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