Lives of the British admirals: containing also a new and accurate naval history, from the earliest periods, Volume 6

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Page 333 - I am, that justice will be done to my reputation hereafter: the manner and cause of raising and keeping up the popular clamour and prejudice against me, will be seen through. I shall be considered (as I now perceive myself) a victim destined to divert the indignation and resentment of an injured and deluded people from the proper objects.
Page 317 - Article of War, part of which he falls under, and which admits of no mitigation, even if the crime should be committed by an error in judgment only; and therefore, for our own consciences sakes, as well as in justice to the prisoner, we pray your Lordships, in the most earnest manner, to recommend him to his Majesty's clemency.
Page 239 - He was in private life humane, temperate, just, and bountiful ; in public station valiant, prudent, wise, and honest ; easy of access to all ; plain and unaffected in his manners, steady and resolute in his conduct ; so remarkably happy in his presence of mind, that no danger ever discomposed him. Esteemed and favoured by his king, beloved and honoured by his country, he died the 21th of May, 17^3 ; aged 79.
Page 316 - Every person in the Fleet, who through Cowardice, Negligence, or Disaffection, shall in time of Action withdraw or keep back, or not come into the Fight or Engagement, or shall not do his utmost to take or destroy every Ship which it shall be his duty to engage, and to assist and relieve...
Page 440 - ... rents or taxes for the term of ten years, at the -expiration whereof no person to pay more than one shilling per annum for -every fifty acres so granted. That a grant of ten acres...
Page 332 - thank God I can do it myself; I think I can ; I am sure " I can;" and tied it behind his head himself.
Page 316 - Smith, Captain Gardiner, and other officers of the ship, who were near the person of the Admiral, that they did not perceive any backwardness in him during the action, or any marks of fear or...
Page 317 - ... near the person of the Admiral, that they did not perceive any backwardness in him during the action, or any marks of fear or confusion, either from his countenance or behaviour, but that he seemed to give his orders coolly and distinctly, and did not seem wanting in personal courage, and from other circumstances, the Court do not believe that his misconduct arose either from cowardice or disaffection, and do therefore unanimously think it their duty, most earnestly to recommend him as a proper...
Page 335 - tis my duty to send you the copy of the letter which I have just received from the Marishal Duke of Richlieu : honour, humanity, and equity order me to convey it into your hands. This noble and unexpected testimony from one of the most candid as well as the most generous of my countrymen, makes me presume your judges will do you the same justice. I am, with respect, Sir, &c. " VOLTAIRE. "To the Hon. J. Byng, Esq.
Page 323 - Whether you are of opinion that you have any particulars to reveal relative to the case of, and the sentence passed upon, Admiral Byng, which you' judge necessary for His Majesty's information, and which you think likely to incline His Majesty to mercy/' — Keppel replied, "I think that I cannot answer that question without particularising the reasons for my vote and opinion.

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