The Horticultural review and botanical magazine, Volume 3

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Page 255 - Made for our searching: yes, in spite of all, Some shape of beauty moves away the pall From our dark spirits. Such the sun, the moon, Trees old and young, sprouting a shady boon For simple sheep; and such are daffodils, With the green world they live in...
Page 558 - God made the flowers to beautify The earth, and cheer man's careful mood; And he is happiest who has power To gather wisdom from a flower, And wake his heart in every hour To pleasant gratitude.
Page 378 - I am the true vine, and my Father is the husbandman. Every branch in me that beareth not fruit, he taketh away ; and every branch that beareth fruit, he purgeth it, that it may bring forth more fruit.
Page 11 - Reaumur has proved that in five generations one Aphis may be the progenitor of 5,904,900,000 descendants ; and it is supposed that in one year there may be twenty generations...
Page 549 - It is not impertinent to offer flowers to a stranger. The poorest child can proffer them to the richest. A hundred persons turned together into a meadow full of flowers would be drawn together in a transient brotherhood.
Page 40 - The Treasurer shall collect and hold all funds of the Society, and pay •out the same only on the order of the Secretary, countersigned by the President.
Page 7 - But the most beautiful tree found in this district is a species of weeping cypress, which I had never met with in any other part of China, and which was quite new to me. It was during one of my daily rambles that I saw the first specimen. About half a mile distant from where I was I observed a noblelooking...
Page 508 - Lee was the delighted possessor of three hundred fucia plants, all giving promise of blossom. The two which opened first were removed into his show-house. A lady came — " Why, Mr. Lee, my dear Mr. Lee, where did you get this charming flower ?" " Hem ! 'tis a new thing, my lady — pretty, is it not ?"
Page 507 - A coach was called, in which was safely deposited our florist, and his seemingly dear purchase. His first work was to pull off and utterly destroy every vestige of blossom and blossombud ; it was divided into cuttings, which were forced into bark beds and hot beds, were redivided and subdivided.
Page 237 - ITEMS. culture, promote and diffuse agricultural knowledge ; to examine, and when necessary, report upon the practicability of establishing agricultural schools, colleges, and model farms ; to set forth the advantages of agricultural and geological surveys, and to show the importance of the application of science to agriculture ; to represent, through their reports, the relation of American agriculture to that of foreign countries, and...

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