The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 90

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Atlantic Monthly Company, 1902 - Current events
 

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Page 202 - And the elements' rage, the fiend-voices that rave, Shall dwindle, shall blend, Shall change, shall become first a peace out of pain, Then a light, then thy breast, O thou soul of my soul! I shall clasp thee again, And with God be the rest!
Page 131 - Europe as being, for intellectual and spiritual purposes, one great confederation, bound to a joint action and working to a common result; and whose members have, for their proper outfit, a knowledge of Greek, Roman, and Eastern antiquity, and of one another.
Page 203 - I wish that he were come to me, For he will come,' she said. 'Have I not prayed in Heaven?— on earth, Lord, Lord, has he not pray'd?
Page 317 - How use doth breed a habit in a man ! This shadowy desert, unfrequented woods, I better brook than flourishing peopled towns : Here can I sit alone, unseen of any, And, to the nightingale's complaining notes, Tune my distresses, and record
Page 587 - On all sides, are we not driven to the conclusion that, of the things which man can do or make here below, by far the most momentous, wonderful and worthy are the things we call Books...
Page 209 - Eyes, ears took in their dole, Brain treasured up the whole; Should not the heart beat once "How good to live and learn"?
Page 202 - No ! let me taste the whole of it, fare like my peers The heroes of old, Bear the brunt, in a minute pay glad life's arrears, Of pain, darkness, and cold.
Page 9 - And with the incorporal air do hold discourse ? Forth at your eyes your spirits wildly peep ; And, as the sleeping soldiers in the alarm, Your bedded hair, like life in excrements f> Starts up, and stands on end.
Page 479 - Slowly and sadly we laid him down, From the field of his fame fresh and gory; We carved not a line, and we raised not a stone, But we left him alone with his glory.
Page 209 - Therefore I summon age To grant youth's heritage, Life's struggle having so far reached its term: Thence shall I pass, approved A man, for aye removed From the developed brute ; a God though in the germ.

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