History of England from the Peace of Utrecht to the Peace of Aix-la-Chaoelle (to the Peace of Versailles

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Interesting 19th century work - if you like that sort of thing. Read full review

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Page 257 - ... a cabinet so variously inlaid; such a piece of diversified mosaic; such a tessellated pavement without cement; here a bit of black stone and there a bit of white; patriots and courtiers; king's friends and republicans; Whigs and Tories; treacherous friends and open enemies; that it was indeed a very curious show, but utterly unsafe to touch, and unsure to stand on.
Page 194 - Be to her faults a little blind ; Be to her virtues very kind.
Page 131 - I have lived, sir, a long time, and the longer I live the more convincing proofs I see of this truth, that God governs in the affairs of men. And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without His notice, is it probable that an empire can rise without His aid ? We have been assured, 'sir, in the sacred writings, that, 'except the Lord build the house, they labor in vain that build it.
Page 192 - I rejoice that America has resisted. Three millions of people, so dead to all the feelings of liberty as voluntarily to submit to be slaves, would have been fit instruments to make slaves of the rest.
Page 193 - The Americans have not acted in all things with prudence and temper: they have been wronged: they have been driven to madness by injustice. Will you punish them for the madness you have occasioned? Rather let prudence and temper come first from this side. I will undertake for America that she will follow the example. There...
Page 214 - I was not, like his Grace of Bedford, swaddled, and rocked, and dandled into a legislator; " Nitor in adversum" is the motto for a man like me. I possessed not one of the qualities, nor cultivated one of the arts, that recommend men to the favour and protection of the great.
Page 376 - namely, that the Marquis is an honest and honourable man, "but that 'Moderation! Moderation!' is the burden of the " song among the body. For myself I am resolved to be in " earnest for the public, and shall be a scare-crow of violence "to the gentle warblers of the grove, the moderate Whigs, "and temperate statesmen.
Page 218 - He that wrestles with us strengthens our nerves, and sharpens our skill. Our antagonist is our helper. This amicable conflict with difficulty obliges us to an intimate acquaintance with our object, and compels us to consider it in all its relations. It will not suffer us to be superficial.
Page 360 - They did not say, these are the rights of the great barons, or these are the rights of the great prelates : — No, my lords ; they said, in the simple Latin of the times, nullus liber homo, and provided as carefully for the meanest subject as for the greatest.
Page 188 - I called it forth, and drew into your service a hardy and intrepid race of men — men who, when left by your jealousy, became a prey to the artifices of your enemies, and had gone nigh to have overturned the state in the war before the last. These men, in the last war, were brought to combat on your side. They served with fidelity, as they fought with valour, and conquered for you in every part of the world.

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