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Having uttered the few last words touched by it. He behaved, inwith faltering accents, he tell back deed, with such a coolness and inin his chair, and wept aloud. difference, and discovered such an

Mr. Boyne was very much af. insolent felf-fatisfaction, that Mr. fected by his friend's laft speech; Boyne was provoked at length to fill more was he moved by his say some very severe things to him. tears. He made no reply to it, Finding, however, that he was not however. Instead of returning any only disregarded, but sneered at, answer, he abruptly left the room; laughed at for his well-meant offileaving the unhappy father to give ciousness, he beheld the son of his a vent to that affliction which fa. friend as an abandoned character, thers only, and in his fituation, and retired. can endure.

By an obftinate and thoughtless The abrupt departure of Mr. perseverance in his evil courses, Boyne was not occafioned by any Harry increased the affliction of his want of sympathetic regard for his father, the misery of whose mind diftrefied friend; it was occasioned in a hort time injured his conftituby the fincerelt compassion for him. tion; he drooped and died. Strongly affected by the last expref. When Harry was informed of fons, which he could hardly arti- his father's death, he was at a dir-' culate, he went immediately to the tance from Dublin. Having greathouse of him who had given birth ly impaired his fortune, by affocito them. To Harry's house he ciating with his expensive and gamwent with the most commendable ing companions, and not being dengn; with a view to make him able to bear the thoughts of leken, not only forry for his behaviour to ing his appearance with them, he bis father, but alamed of it, with had taken lodgings in a town about 2 view to animate him with an ear a day's journey from the capital neft defire to atone for the errors of where he was altogether unknown, his past, by the exemplariness of and, driven by necessity, lived in a his future life.

very frugal, not to say contracted, Impelled by motives so truly lau- manner. There, out of the reach dable, Mr. Boyne, as soon as he of those people who had been his was admitted into Harry Sullivan's seducers, not his friends, his recoldresling room, entered upon the bu. lections were extremely painful. finess which engrossed his attention. He there remembered, with the He always hated delay; he was deepest regret, every thing he had now more than ever inclined to diso done to render his father wretchparch. After having blamed his ed, and, in the bitter moments of way of life in general, he dwelt contrition, accused himself of have particularly on his behaviour to his ing shortened his days. His confaher, for wbich, he told him, he trition, and his circumkances togewould stand condemned by every ther (for his income was man whose esteem was an honour. very slender one) operated so pow

Harry, whose head was intoxi. erfully upon his mind that he was cated with his genteel connections, half distracted. would not hear of giving them up ; A second express, soon after the and as for the picture of his father's arrival of the firit, informed him, concern on his account, strikingly that his father had only left him exhibited to him, in consequence mourning. The letter was written of his licentiousness, and filiai in- by Mr. Boyne, the principal exegratitude, he was not in the lealtcutor, to whom Mr. Sullivan had

bequeathed

now a

bequeathed the greatest part of his with ideas as magnificent as his fortune.

own, by the splendor of his descripThis blow was severely felt, but tions relating to the first city in the it did not ftun him; he was roused kingdom, which the had never seen. by it. Smarting under the lashes By wishing to return to Dublin, of repentance, “ It is what I have Harry was certainly governed by deserved," exclaimed he, tearing vanity and pride (two passions which the letter which brought him the occasion much bustle, and somecutting intelligence ; " so good a times bloodshed, in the world) but fatber merited very different treat- he could not have taken a more ment from me. Existence now is a censurable step. At his return to burden; but let cowards destroy Dublin, he renewed his acquaintshin felves. I do not wish to live; ance with all those young fellows but I wilh rather to die fighting whose society had been detrimental againīt the enemies of my king, to his affairs, and lived in fo exthan to be my own ti.ccutioner. travagant a style, that Mrs. SulliThere are troops going to embark van began to be alarmed; the rafor America ; I will accompany pid diminution of his fortune both them as a volunteer, and in the alarmed and distressed her. Intefirst action in which I am engaged, rest out of the question, the had the I will throw myself into the most fincereft regard for him; and as dangerous situation.”

The had reason to believe, from the At the conclusion of this solilo tenderness of his behaviour to her, quy, he made immediate prepara- that he should have some influence tions for bis journey to the fea-port over bim, she took an opportouity town, where the troops destined to one day, when he was in high good America were to embark.

humour, to remonstrate against the While he was waiting there for a indiscreetness of his proceedings. wind, an event happened which With an energy equal to her love, changed all his military resoluti. she conjured him to stop before it

The only daughter of the was too late, and to make retrenchsichest citizen belonging to the ments in his way of living, sufficitown, with whom he danced at the

ent to prevent the ruin with which allembly.room, a few nights after his they were threatered. She realonarrival, fell in love with him. As ed, me entreated, the kneeled, she she was a very fine girl, and had a wept, but to no purpose, her large fortune in her own hands, he thoughtless Harry was irreclaimathought it most prodent to avail ble. hintelf of the frongly visible pre Mrs. Sullivan, finding that all poffeflions in his favous; he there Ger efforts to induce her husband to fore gave up Mars for Hymen ; in pa a proper attention to economy, plain English, he married her.

only served to deprive her of his Harry, when he had made Miss company, ceased to ialk to him Baxter his wife, and got all her upon the subject which lay nearest moveables into his power, felt all to her heart; b:The suffered exhis former gay ideas revive, and he tremely by keeping her thoughts was leized with a violent deûre to on it to herself; they preyed upon figure again in Dublin. Spurred her fpirits, and she fell into a very on by this desire, he carried his melancholy way. Sally to the capital in the moft ex Harry, not able to bear a me. peditious mode of travelling, and lancholy wife, was now rarely at endeavoured to infame her mind home; he was perpetually making

expensive

Ons.

YA

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expensive excursions with his dissi- without taking leave of any body, pated friends.

set out post for the village where While he was upon a party of his poor dear Sally (so he now pleasure with one of his most fpi- called her) was meanly accommosited companions, at his sporting dated, for whom he was doubly seat, he received a letter which concerned, as he knew she was near gave a considerable check to his her time. gaiety, as he found by it that there When the chaise stopped, he felt was an execution in his house, and his blood run cold, and he tremthat his wife had been obliged to bled to such a degree when he quitremove to a Mabby apartment, in ted it, that he could scarce walk up the most pitiable condition.

to the room to which he was directa This intelligence, which he had ed by the person before ; to which, not expected, though he had been indeed, he would not have been fufficiently warned of his approach- immediately admitted, had his aring ruin, completely opened his rival been foreseen. eyes, and he beheld himself with The moment he entered the chamabhorrence. The reflections which ber he saw his Sally a corpse, with crouded into his mind we

were hardly her infant dead by her side. He supportable. In the keenelt lan- stood for some time at the feet of guage did he condemn himself for the bed aghaft, and funk down upall the follies and vices which he on it without any signs of life; nor had committed, and repeatedly ex was he in the leait fengible of his claimed, “ Had I not brought my removal into another apartment. Sally to misery, I could land this When he came a little to himself, Thock, severe as it is; but when I he was informed that a gentleman think of her condition, when I wished to speak with him upon parthink of my behaviour to the kind. ticular business. This gentleman eit, beft of fathers

was Mr. Boyne, who came in order Here he was interrupted by the to make over to him that fortune noisy entrance of a couple of his which his father had intended to companions, in order to appeal to leave him, if his disobedience and him about a dispute of the most tri- ingratitude had not made him befling nature imaginable.

queath it to his most intimate friend. Harry, not at all in a humour to Mr. Boyne, by this proceeding, actrelish their mirth, considered them ed a very as intruders, and their business ri nerous design was frustrated, by the diculous, and peevishly requested distraction of him who had, accordtheir absence ; 'finding, however, ing to his idea of justice, a right to that they had recourse to raillery, the fortune he wilhed to transfer to inftead of complying with his de. him. fures, he quited the apartment, and,

To the Printer of the HIBERNIAN MAGAZINE.
SIR,

During my juvenile years, I was AM not about to revile the cha- remarkable for my dullness and fashion of the times, hold up the and began to bustle in the world, moft innocent to public derifion, I had just sense enough to perceive but present you with a character of how ignorant I really was." I now myself.

determined on a sudden to be a

noble part;

but his ge

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man

man of letters. Within the space patriotic society, that I am there of fix months I learned the Greek considered as a Cicero or Demo. alphabet, went through Clarke's Athenes. Latin grammar, read fome scraps Though the studies of history and of the classics, and, before the ex. biography are undoubtedly useful piration of the twelvemonth, actu. to the last degree, yet there are ally translated a French novel into some instances where they are preEnglish.

judicial; and here again I am an It is a just observation, that real unhappy example. An impartial genius and merit are timid and historian lays before us the characdoubtful of themselves, while ig- ters of mankind, with all their virnorance and conceit are ever fora tưes and defects, but often leaves ward, bold, and affuming. Among us to ourselves to determine, which the number of this laft class I un are worthy of imitation, and which happily make one: I have read ought to be Munned. Very unformany things, but studied few; and cunately, by some means or other, have dipped into the whole circle I Itumbled on the Lives of the Roof the sciences, withont being able man Philosophers; and having read to speak with propriety on any. I them, nothing would now serve me have obliged the world with several but I must be a Roman philoso. curious publications, of which this pher. blind and illiterate age has not yet From this moment I contracted been able to discover the beauties. my brow, assumed an air of gravity,

Ignorance and impudence are in- and feldom gave an answer to a separable companions, and I am question the first time of asking. told they are so in me. Indeed, 1 Often have I fneaked into án obbelieve, I should hardly ever gain scure public house, and feasted on an argument, were is not for the a morsel of bread and cheese, rainvincible brass, of which Nature ther than accept the invitation of a has been lavifh in my composition. friend to an elegant repaft-this my Nature has denied me a genius, Roman spirit would not let me fuband Fortune the allistance of a gen. mit co. In every dispute I always teel education. Though publicly take the wrong fide of the question 1 affect to be thought easy in point-it is acting like a Roman to dif. of circumstances, yet I have reason fer from the common herd of manto fear, that every one knows the kind. To my inferiors I am overcontrary; and the uneasiness I have bearing and insolent, to my supe. frequently felt from the want of riors furly and morose ; and I have current cash, has so much foured oftentimes expofed myself to the my temper, that I have drawn on greatest inconveniences, merely for myself the title of Dichie Growler, the sake of telling my betters their by which I am now more known own; that truth is not to be spoler than by my real name.

at all times is to me a moft diaboli. In converfation, I always take cal doctrine. care to introduce some particular I have many more things to add ; point of learning, of which I sup- but I fear I have already intruded pose every one in company knows on your patience ; I shali therefore as little as myself. By this good conclude with begging of you, for management I have, in fome few heaven's fake, (for surely you must instances, acquired the reputation be a wonderful man!) to tell me of a profound scholar; and so well how I fall get rid of the hateful have I carried on this faice in a

name of
Dickie GROWLER.

To

pole every one in company knows on your patience; I hall therefore as little as mylelf. By this good conclude with begging of you, for management I have, in fome few heaven's fake, (for forely you mult instances, acquired the reputation be a wonderful man!) to tell me

To the Printer of the HIBERNIAN MAGAZINE.

man of letters. Within the space patriotic society, that I am there
of fix months I learned the Greek considered as a Cicero or Demo.
alphabet, went through Clarke's Athenes.
Latin grammar, tead tome scraps Though the studies of hilory and
of the claffics, and, before ihe ex. biography are undoubtedly useful
piration of the swelvemonth, actu. to the last degree, yet there are
ally tranllared a French novel into some inftances where they are pre-
English.

judicial; and here again I am an
It is a just observation, that real unhappy example. An impartial
genius and merit are timid and historian lays before us the charac-
doubtful of themselves, while ig- ters of mankind, with all their vir.
norance and conceic are ever for. tưes and defects, but often leaves
ward, bold, and assuming. Among us to ourselves to determine, which
the number of this laft class l un are worthy of imitation, and which
happily make one : I have read cught to be funned. Very unfor.
many things, but studied few; and tunately, by some means or other,
have dipped into the whole circle Iltumbled on the lives of the Ro-
of the sciences, without being able man Philosophers; and having read
to speak with propriety on any. I them, nothing would now ferve me
have obliged the world with several but / mult be a Roman philoío-
curious publications, of which this pher.
blind and illiterate age has not yet From this moment I contracted
been able to discover the beauties. my brow, affomed an air of gravity,

Ignorance and impudence are in. and feldom gave an answer to a separable companions, and I am question the first time of a king. told they are so in me. Indeed, 1 Often have I fneaked into an ob. believe,'I should hardly ever gain fcure public house, and feafted on an argument, were it not for the a morsel of bread and cheese, ra invincible brass, of which Nature ther than accept the invitation of 3 has been lavish in my compohtion. friend to an elegant repaft-chis my Nacure has denied me a genius, Roman spirit would not let me luband Fortune the ailistance of a gen. mit to. In every dispute I always teel education. Though publicly take the wrong fide of the question

SIR,
THE

HE dying expressions of the goodness had so long Aowed, as

late Lord Lyttleton merit from a copious spring. Doctor, said preservation in your repository. A he, you shall be my confessor. kilful physician of Kidderminster, When I first fet out in the world, I who attended his Lordship in his last had friends who had endeavoured fickness, writes as follows : to shake my belief in the Christian

“ Auguft 28, 1773. religion. Í faw difficulties which " On sunday evening, the symp- staggered me ; but I kept my mind toms of his Lordship’s disorder, open to conviction. The evidences which for a week past had alarmed and doctrines of christianity, tudied vs, put on a fatal appearance, and with attention, made me a most his Lordship believed himself to be firm and persuaded believer of the a dying man from this time he christian religion. I have made it suffered by restlessness rather than the rule of my life, and it is the pain ; and though his nerves were ground of my future hopes. I have apparently muchfuttered, his men erred and firined; but have repenttal faculties never seemed stronger ed, and never indulged any vicious when he was thoroughly awake. habit. In politics and public life,

" His Lordship's bilious and I have made public good the rule hepatic complainis seemed alone of my conduct. I never gave counnot equal to the expected mournful sels which I did not at that time event: his long want of sleep, think the best. I have seen that I whether the consequence of irrita was sometimes in the wrong ; but I tion in the bowels

, or, which is did not err designedly. I have enmore probable, of causes of a dif- deavoured in private life to do all ferent kind, accounts for his loss of the good in my power, and never trength, and for his death, very for å moment could indulge malici

ous or unjust designs against any " Thor his Lordship withed his person whatsoever. approaching diffolution not to be " At another time, he said, I lingering, he waited for it with re must leave my soul in the same fignation. He said, it is a folly; a ftate it was in before this illness :

me in misery, now to at I find this a very inconvenient time tempt to prolong life ; yet.

he for solicitude about any thing. easily perfuaded, for the satisfaction “ On the evening, when the of others, 'to do or take any thing fymptoms of death came on, he thought proper for him. On Sa faid, I shall die ; but it will not turday he had been remarkably bet- be your fault.-When Lord and ter, and we were not without some

Lady V a came to see his Lord

ship, he gave them his folemn be"On Sunday, about it in the nedi&tion, and said, Be good, be forenoon, his Lordship sent for me,

virtuous, my Lord ; you must come and said he felt a great hurry, and

to this. Thus he continued giving wihed to have a little conversation his dying benedictions to all around with me in order to divert it. He him.' on Monday morning a lucid

to open the foun- interval gave some small hopes ; tains of that heart from whence but there vanished in the evening;

And F

sufficiently

keeping

1 affedt to be thought easy in point it is acting like a Roman 10 dif. of circumstances, yet I have reason fer from the common herd of manso fear, that every one knows the kind. To my inferiors I am over. contrary; and the uneasiness I have bearing and insolent

, so my fupe

. frequently felt from the want of riors furly and morose ; and I have current cash, has so much foured oftentimes exposed myself to the my temper, that I have drawn on greatest inconveniences, merely for mífell the title of Dichie Growler, the sake of relling my betters their by which I am now more known own; that trutb is me to be fpeler

at all times is to me a molt diaboli

.

was

hopes of his recovery.

than by my real name.

In conversacion, I always take cal doctrine. care to introduce fome particular

I have many more things to add ; point of learning, of which

I fup but I fear ! have alreadý intruded

then proceeded

January, 1774.

found Icholar; and fouell how I shåll get rid of the hateful
this face in a name of

Dickie GROWLEK

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