A practical treatise on the law of evidence: and digest of proofs, in civil and criminal proceedings, Volume 3

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Page 1461 - In all actions arising under the laws respecting copyrights the defendant may plead the general issue, and give the special matter in evidence.
Page 1530 - No allegation, whether it be necessary or unnecessary, whether it be more or less particular, which is descriptive of the identity of that which is legally essential to the charge in the indictment, can ever be rejected as surplusage.
Page 1530 - It is a most general rule that no allegation which is descriptive of the identity of that which is legally essential to the claim or charge can ever be rejected.
Page 1148 - interest or no interest," or "without further proof of interest than the policy itself," or "without benefit of salvage to the insurer...
Page 1754 - When a witness, in support of a prosecution, has been examined in chief, and has not been asked in cross-examination as to any declarations made by him, or acts done by him, to procure persons corruptly to give evidence in support of the prosecution...
Page 1266 - ... an accusation easily to be made and hard to be proved, and harder to be defended by the party accused, tho never so innocent.
Page 1109 - But in England, where the jury are the sole judges of the fact, hearsay evidence is properly excluded, because no man can tell what effect it might have upon their minds.
Page 993 - ... name and place of abode of the person who is to bring such action, and the name and place of abode of the attorney or agent, and no evidence of the cause of such action shall be produced, except of such as shall be contained in such notice...
Page 1361 - Schedule nor expressly exempted from all stamp duty), where the matter thereof shall be of the value of 201. or upwards, whether the same shall be only evidence of a contract, or obligatory upon the parties from its being a written instrument...
Page 1681 - Kent, or the custom of any borough, or any other particular custom, shall be in writing, and signed by the party so devising the same, or by some other person in his presence and by his express directions, and shall be attested and subscribed in the presence of the said devisor by three or four credible witnesses, or else they shall be utterly void and of none effect.

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