Cicero: Ten Orations and Selected Letters

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American book Company, 1912 - Speeches, addresses, etc., Latin - 310 pages
 

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Page 298 - Itaque te plane etiam atque etiam rogo, ut et ornes ea vehementius etiam, quam fortasse sentis, et in eo leges historiae neglegas...
Page 153 - ... quantum ad alias voluptates et ad ipsam requiem animi et corporis conceditur temporum, quantum alii tribuunt tempestivis conviviis, quantum denique alveolo, quantum...
Page 159 - Nam, si quis minorem gloriae fructum putat ex Graecis versibus percipi quam ex Latinis, vehementer errat; propterea quod Graeca leguntur in omnibus fere gentibus, Latina suis finibus, exiguis sane, continentur.
Page 5 - ... period. The source of each illustration is accurately indicated. ^| The aim of this edition has been helpfulness toward an appreciation of Cicero and of his literary work and the exclusion of borrowed or original erudition. Such help as seemed to be required by the ordinary student is freely given, but the smoothing out of difficulties which the pupil may reasonably be expected to conquer by himself has been avoided. Grammatical principles are enunciated as far as possible, and references to...
Page 156 - ... atque sie a summis hominibus eruditissimisque accepimus: ceterarum rerum studia et doctrina et praeceptis et arte constare, poetam natura ipsa valere et mentis viribus excitari et quasi divino quodam spiritu inflari. quare suo iure noster ille Ennius sanctos appellat poetas, quod quasi deorum aliquo dono atque munere commendati nobis esse videantur.
Page 139 - Most potent, grave, and reverend signiors, My very noble and approved good masters, — That I have ta'en away this old man's daughter, It is most true ; true, I have married her ; The very head and front of my offending Hath this extent, no more. Rude am I in my speech, And little bless'd with the soft phrase of peace ; For since these arms of mine had seven years...
Page 44 - ... Gymnasium 64 (1957) 131. See RG Austin (Aen. 2.21) on the epic mannerism in the following in eum locum (55.5). quod Tullianum appellatur: after Ennius, eg Ann. 409, Sc. 345V, attraction of the relative where the predicative noun is a name is attested only in prose. See Kuhner-Stegmann, i.38f. The career, between the Temple of Concord and the Curia at the foot of the Capitol, consisted of several rooms, of which the Tullianum was the death-chamber. No satisfactory explanation of the name Tullianum...

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