Observations on popular antiquities: including the whole of mr. Bourne's Antiquitates vulgares. revised by sir H. Ellis

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Page 93 - If I beheld the sun when it shined, Or the moon walking in brightness ; And my heart hath been secretly enticed, Or my mouth hath kissed my hand : This also were an iniquity to be punished by the judge : For I should have denied the God that is above.
Page 215 - Lead then, said Eve. He leading swiftly roll'd In tangles, and made intricate seem straight. To mischief swift. Hope elevates, and joy Brightens his crest. As when a wandering fire, Compact of unctuous vapour, which the night Condenses, and the cold environs round, Kindled through agitation to a flame, Which oft, they say, some evil spirit attends, Hovering and blazing with delusive light, Misleads the amazed night-wanderer from his way To bogs and mires, and oft through pond or pool, There swallow'd...
Page 40 - I am thy father's spirit ; Doom'd for a certain term to walk the night ; And for the day confined to fast in fires, Till the foul crimes done in my days of nature Are burnt and purged away.
Page 157 - ... ineffectual. Having occasion to enlarge my garden not long since, I cut down two or three such trees, one of which did not grow together. We have several persons now living in the village, who, in their childhood, were supposed to be healed by this superstitious ceremony, derived down perhaps from our Saxon ancestors, who practised it before their conversion to Christianity.
Page 218 - This Puck seems but a dreaming dolt, Still walking like a ragged colt, And oft out of a bush doth bolt, Of purpose to deceive us ; And, leading us, makes us to stray, Long winters nights out of the way, And when we stick in mire and clay, He doth with laughter leave us.
Page 151 - Himself best knows . but strangely-visited people, All swoln and ulcerous, pitiful to the eye, The mere despair of surgery, he cures ; Hanging a golden stamp about their necks, Put on with holy prayers : and, 'tis spoken, To the succeeding royalty he leaves The healing benediction.
Page 41 - Through skies, where I could count each little star. The fanning west wind scarcely stirs the leaves ; The river, rushing o'er its pebbled bed, Imposes silence, with a stilly sound. In such a place as this, at such an hour, If ancestry can be in aught believed, Descending spirits have conversed with man, And told the secrets of the world unknown.
Page 109 - Is it not ominous in all countries, When crows and ravens croak upon trees ? The Roman senate, when within The city walls an owl was seen, Did cause their clergy, with lustrations, Our Synod calls humiliations, The round-faced prodigy t' avert From doing town or country hurt.
Page 172 - And they, who to be sure of Paradise, Dying, put on the weeds of Dominic, Or in Franciscan think to pass disguised.
Page 78 - mind upon the eye, or by the eye upon the mind, by which " things distant and future are perceived and seen as if they

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