Memoirs of Goldoni, Volume 2

Front Cover
Hunt and Clark, 1828 - Authors, Italian
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 40 - Doctor we observe the ancient costume of the university and bar of Bologna, which is nearly the same at this day; and the idea of the singular mask which covers his face and nose was taken from a wine stain which disfigured the countenance of a jurisconsult in those times. This is a tradition still existing among the amateurs of the comedy of art. Brighella and Harlequin, called in Italy the two Zani, were taken from Bergamo; because, the former being a very sharp fellow and the other a stupid clown,...
Page 41 - The mask must always be very prejudicial to the action of the performer, either in joy or sorrow: whether he be in love, cross, or good•humored, the same features are always exhibited; and however he may gesticulate and vary the tone, he can never convey by the countenance, which is the interpreter of the heart, the different passions with which he is inwardly agitated.
Page 107 - Imaginaire," which displeased the court, and ruined the piece. When a new piece was to be performed, the chief actor summoned the troop in the morning, read the plot, and explained the story, to contrive scenes. It was like playing the whole performance before the actors. These hints of scenes were all the rehearsal. When the actor entered on the scene he did...
Page 41 - ... he can never convey by the countenance, which is the interpreter of the heart, the different passions with which he is inwardly agitated. The masks of the Greeks and Romans were a sort of speaking trumpets, invented for the purpose of conveying the sound through the vast extent of their amphitheatres.
Page 39 - ... always been a Venetian, the doctor a Bolognese, and Brighella and Harlequin, Bergamasks ; and from these places, therefore, the comic personages called the four masks of the Italian comedy, were taken by the players. What I say on this subject is not altogether the creature of my imagination : I possess a manuscript of the fifteenth century, in very good preservation, and bound in parchment, containing a hundred and twenty subjects, or sketches of Italian pieces, called comedies of art, and of...
Page 3 - These two historical facts accord so well together, that the unity of action is perfectly observed. The impostors of Paris, alarmed at the comedy of ' Moliere,' knew that the author had sent to the camp, where Louis XIV then was, to obtain permission for its representation, and they were afraid lest the revocation of the prohibition should be obtained. I employed in my piece a person of the name of Pirlon, a hypocrite in every sense of the word...
Page 38 - Those who first endeavoured to bring about its revival, not finding, in an ignorant age, writers of sufficient skill, had the boldness to draw out plans, to distribute them into acts and scenes and to utter, extempore, the subjects, thoughts, and witticisms, which they had concerted among themselves. Those -who could read, (and neither the great nor the rich were of the number...
Page 234 - I RETURN to my regimen, — you will say here also, perhaps, that I ought to omit it: you are in the right; but all this is in my head, and I must be delivered of it by degrees; I cannot spare you a single comma. After dinner I am not fond of either working or walking. Sometimes I go to the theatre, but I am most generally in parties till nine o'clock in the evening I always return before ten o'clock. I take two or three small cakes with a glass of wine and water, and this is the whole of my supper....
Page 38 - Comedy, which in all ages has been the favorite entertainment of polished nations, shared the fate of the arts and sciences, and was buried under the ruins of the Empire during the decay of letters. The germ of comedy, however, was never altogether extinguished in the fertile bosom of Italy. Those who first endeavored to bring about its revival, not finding in an ignorant age writers of sufficient skill, had the boldness to draw out plans, to distribute them into acts and scenes, and to utter extempore...
Page 40 - ... sharp fellow, and the other a stupid clown, these two extremes are only to be found among the lower orders of that part of the country. Brighella represents an intriguing, deceitful, and knavish valet. His dress is a species of livery; his swarthy mask is a caricature of the color of the inhabitants of those high mountains, tanned by the heat of the sun. Some comedians, in this character, have taken the name of Fenocchio, Fiqueto, and Scapin; but they have always represented the same valet and...

Bibliographic information