The Physics of Star Trek

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Basic Books, Aug 2, 2007 - Performing Arts - 280 pages
17 Reviews
How does the Star Trek universe stack up against the real universe?
What warps when you're traveling at warp speed? What is the difference between a wormhole and a black hole? Are time loops really possible, and can I kill my grandmother before I am born? Anyone who has ever wondered "could this really happen?" will gain useful insights into the Star Trek universe (and, incidentally, the real world of physics) in this charming and accessible guide. Lawrence M. Krauss boldly goes where Star Trek has gone-and beyond. From Newton to Hawking, from Einstein to Feynman, from Kirk to Picard, Krauss leads readers on a voyage to the world of physics as we now know it and as it might one day be.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - greeniezona - LibraryThing

One could almost believe this book is contemporary, with the recent Star Trek reboot movie bringing Trek back into popular culture, but alas, this book is from 1995. (It would have been really ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Cheryl_in_CC_NV - LibraryThing

Sorry, just could not get into it. Took me four days, and usually when I read a science book I read over 300 pp in two days. I think it's somewhat dated - haven't we dismissed the idea of superstrings ... Read full review

Contents

Einstein Raises
15
Hawking Shows His Hand
37
Data Ends the Game
67
SECTION
79
The Most Bang for Your Buck
109
Holodecks and Holograms
129
SECTION THREE
141
The Menagerie of Possibilities
173
The Undiscoverable Country
211
EPILOGUE
229
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
235
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
251
Copyright

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Page 15 - There was a young lady named Bright, Whose speed was far faster than light; She set out one day In a relative way And returned on the previous night.

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About the author (2007)

Lawrence Krauss is director of the Origins Project at Arizona State University. He is the author of more than 300 scientific publications and ten books, including A Universe from Nothing and The Greatest Story Ever Told -So Far. Krauss is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is a regular columnist for newspapers and magazines, including The New Yorker, and he appears frequently on radio, television, and in feature films. Krauss lives in Portland, Oregon, and Tempe, Arizona.