History of England from the Peace of Utrecht to the Peace of Aix-la-Chaoelle (to the Peace of Versailles

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Page iii - Blessed are the barren, and the wombs that never bare, and the paps which never gave suck. Then shall they begin to say to the mountains, Fall on us ; and to the hills, Cover us. For if they do these things in a green tree, what shall be done in the dry ? And there were also two other, malefactors, led with him to be put to death.
Page 130 - " the ocean — her boasted grand and substantial supe" riority, which made the world bend before her ! Oh " inestimable rights, that have taken from us our rank " among nations, our importance abroad, and our hap" piness at home ; that have taken from us our trade, our " manufactures, and our commerce ; that have reduced " us from the most flourishing empire in the world to be " one of the most compact, unenviable powers on the " face of the globe ! Oh wonderful rights that are likely " to take...
Page 214 - I will be very frank with you. I was the last to consent to the separation; but the separation having been made, and having become inevitable, I have always said, as I say now, that I would be the first to meet the friendship of the United States as an independent power.
Page 320 - An examination for a Degree at " Oxford was in my time a farce. I was examined in " Hebrew, and in History. ' What is the Hebrew for "'the place of a skull?' I replied,
Page 86 - formally before the Court, but for that very reason I " will bring him before the Court. He has placed these " men in the front of the battle, in hopes to escape under "their shelter, but I will not join in battle with them: " their vices, though screwed up to the highest pitch of " human depravity, are not of dignity enough to vindicate " the combat with ME. I will drag HIM to light who is " the dark mover behind this scene of iniquity.
Page 123 - Granted. It is understood that any property obviously belonging to the inhabitants of these States, in the possession of the garrison, shall be subject to be reclaimed.
Page 323 - Why did I sell my college life (He cries) for benefice and wife? Return, ye days! when endless pleasure I found in reading, or in leisure ! When calm around the common room I puff 'd my daily pipe's perfume!
Page 128 - As he would have taken a ball in his breast,' replied Lord George. 'For he opened his arms, exclaiming wildly, as he paced up and down the apartment during a few minutes: "O God! it is all over!
Page 30 - Sessions-House at the Old Bailey. There were not, I believe, a hundred ; but they did their work at leisure, in full security, without sentinels, without trepidation, as men lawfully employed, in full day.
Page 213 - I shall esteem myself the happiest of men, if I can be instrumental in recommending my country more and more to your Majesty's royal benevolence...

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