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"a bargain is a bargain ; you must even stand to it.'” Sometimes the writer thinks he will rebuke sharply. Thus :-“This “is a wild, mad, and frantic Divinity, just like to the opinions “ of the maids of Aldgate [some Antinomian young women that had been making themselves notorious]. 'Oh,' say they, «« we live in Christ and Christ doth all for us : we are Christed “ in Christ and Godded in God, and at the same time that we “sin here we, joined to Christ, do justice in him.' . . Fie, fie, “blush for shame, and publish no more of this loose Divinity.” But the choicest bit shall come last. Criticising the conclusion of a passage in Milton's treatise, the language of the first portion of which is pronounced “too sublime and angelical for mortal creatures to comprehend it,” the Answerer declares, “This frothy discourse, were it not sugared over with a little “ neat language, would appear so immeritous, so contrary to “ all humane learning, yea truth and common experience “itself, that all that read it must needs count it worthy to “ be burnt by the hangman."

Milton's first glance at the anonymous pamphlet, he tells us, had shown him the sort of person he had to deal with. He could be no educated man, for in the very first page of his pamphlet, where he quotes Greek and Hebrew words, he misspells them. This was do serious crime in itself; only a man falsely pretending to know a language would do worse ! “ Nor did I find this his want of the pretended languages

alone, but accompanied with such a low and homespun "expression of his mother-English all along, without joint

or frame, as made me, ere I knew further of him, often stop “and conclude that this author could for certain be no other " than some mechanic.” It was singular also that, while the Second Edition of the Doctrine and Discipline of Divorce had been out for months before the publication of this Answer, only the First Edition was referred to in the Answer. This, indeed, had enabled Milton to find out who the Answerer was, and the whole history of his pamphlet. For, in the course of the preceding summer, he had been amused by hearing that there was in the press, half printed, an Answer to the First Edition of his Divorce Book, concocted by a committee of heads, in the centre of whom was—“let the reader hold his laughter," he says, and hear the story out—"an actual serving-man.” At least, he had been a serving-man, waiting at table, cleaning trenchers, and the like; but he was ambitious of rising in the world, and had turned Solicitor. Zeal for public morality, or some farther ambition for literary distinction, had put it into his head to answer the First Edition of Milton's treatise ; and, taking into his confidence one or two raw young Divines of his acquaintance, he had actually composed something, and sent it to the press. Milton had resolved that, if the thing did appear, he would leave it unnoticed. For some months, during which it had been lying unfinished in the press, he had quite dismissed it from his mind. But lo! here it was at length, stitched and published—this precious composition of the Serving-man turned Solicitor. Not quite as it had come from his pen, however! A Divine of note-no other, in fact, than Mr. Caryl himself, the Licenser had looked over the thing, and “stuck it here and there with a clove of his own calligraphy to keep it from tainting.” This, and Caryl's approbation prefixed, had rather altered the state of matters; and Milton had resolved that, when he had leisure for a little recreation, his man of law “ should not altogether lose his soliciting.”

Nor does he. Never was poor wretch so mauled, so tumbled and rolled, and kept on tumbling and rolling, in ignot minious mire. Milton indeed pays him the compliment of following his reasonings, restating them in their order, and quoting his words ; but it is only, as it were, to wrap up the reasoner in the rags of his own bringing, and then kick him along as a football through a mile of mud. We need not trouble ourselves with the reasonings, or with the incidental repetitions of Milton's doctrine to which they give rise; it will be enough to exhibit the emphasis of Milton's foot administered at intervals to the human bundle it is propelling. “I mean not to dispute Philosophy with this Pork,” he says near the beginning ; “this clod of an antagonist,” he calls him at the next kick ; “a serving-man both by nature and function, an idiot by breeding, and a solicitor by presump

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tion,” is the third propulsion ; after which we lose reckoning of the number of the kicks, they come sometimes so ingeniously fast. “Basest and hungriest inditer," "groom," “rank pettifogger,” “mere and arrant pettifogger," antic hobnail at a morris but is more handsomely facetious ;” “a boar in a vineyard,” “a snout in this pickle,”

a “the serving-man at Addlegate” (suggested by the maids at Aldgate'), “this odious fool,” “the noisome stench of his rude slot," "the hide of a varlet," "such an unswilled hogshead,” “such a cock-brained solicitor;” “not a golden,

" but a brazen ass;” “ barbarian, the shame of all honest attorneys, why do they not hoist him over the bar and blanket him ?"-such are a few of the varied elegancies. Two or three of them break the bounds within which modern taste permits quotation. “I may be driven," he says in the end, “to curl up this gliding prose into a rough Sotadic, that shall “rime him into such a condition as, instead of judging good “ books to be burnt by the executioner, he shall be readier to "be his own hangman. So much for this nuisance." After which, as if feeling that he had gone too far, he begs any person dissenting from his Doctrine, and willing to argue it fairly, not to infer from this Colasterion that he was displeased at being contradicted in print, or that he did not know how to receive a fair antagonist with civility. Practically, however, I should fancy that, after the Colasterion, most people would be indisposed to try the experiment of knowing what Milton meant by being civil to an antagonist.

VOL. III.

BOOK III.

APRIL 1645- AUGUST 1646.

HISTORY :-SIXTEEN MONTHS OF THE NEw MODEL, AND OF THE

Long PARLIAMENT AND WESTMINSTER ASSEMBLY CONTINUED.
-BATTLE OF NASEBY AND ITS CONSEQUENCES : EPISODE OF
MONTROSE IN SCOTLAND : FLIGHT OF THE KING TO THE
Soots AND CONCLUSION OF THE CIVIL WAR.-PROGRESS OF
TOLERATION CONTROVERSY

STRUGGLE
PRESBYTERIANS AVD THE INDEPENDENTS-
LONDON AND LANCASHIRE PRESBYTERIANIZED.

THE

AND

OF

THE

BETWEEN

THE

BIOGRAPHY :-RETURN OF MILTON'S WIFE: His REMOVAL

FROM ALDERSGATE STREET TO BARBICAN: FIRST EDITION OF
HIS POEMS: THREE MORE SONNETS : CONTINUED PRESBY-
TERIAN ATTACKS ON MILTON : His RETALIATION : TROUBLES
OF THE POWELL FAMILY.

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