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105, 106

art

IIZ

Rubens's and Van Dyke's first studies in Italy Page 102
Drawing, how necessary

103
Academies erecled for the virtuofi, by whom

ib
For what purpo i and how furnished
Greeks and homans, how they cherished and enobled men of

103
Sculptors and painters chief of the court and retinue to the
emperor of Japan

103, 104
Courts of great princes how formerly composed

104
How the ancient and most renowned sculptors were some
encouraged and others obicured

105
Painters frould sometimes draw with the pen

106
What painters
rs made use of prints

ib
And caused their works to be published

ib
How to express the sensation of the relievo or exftancy of
objects by the hatches in graving

107
What shadows are most graceful

IIT
And what artists woik best to imitate

ib
Of counter-batches
One colour, the use and effect of it

ib
Zeuxis used but one colour

ib
What other painters were monochromists, and who introduced
the rest of the colours

ib
Lights and shades, their stupendous effect

ib
Coloreè what it means

ib
The invention of Chevalier Woolson to blazon bearing in
coat-armour by hatches without letters

113
Tonus, what it imports in graving

ib
Of copying after designs and painting
What prints are to be called excellent

ib
How to detect the copy of a print from an original print 114
Aqua fortis, for what gravings moit proper

ib
His highness prince Rupert celebrated, and the gravings by him
published

115
The French king an engraver

ib
Earl of Sandwich dextrous at graving

ib
What emperors, philosophers, poets, and other of the noble
Greeks and Romans excelled in painting and graving

115, 116, 117, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125
Never any of the antients excelled in these arts, but what

were gentlemen
A llave might not be taught to grave or paint, and why 117

Graving

ib

116

Graving accounted one of the liberal arts by Pliny and
Galen

Page 116
Children instructed in the graphical arts

ib
Martia the daughter of Varro, the princess Louise, and
Anna a Schurman, celebrated

ib
Great scholars of late skillful in the art of graving, &c.

117
How far the art of drawing conduces to the Iciences mathe-
matical

ib
Dr. Chr. Wren, Blagrave, Hevelius, &c. celebrated ib
An orator ought to be killed in these arts, and why

ib
The Abbot de Maroles, his fingular affection to, and prodigious
collections of prints

118, 119
Of what great use and benefit the art of graving may be to the

education of children superior to all other inventions, and
how

120, 121, 122, 123
Prints more estimable than painting, and why
What gentlemen of quality are the greatest collectors of prints
in France

ib
At how high rates the prints of the most famous masters are

ib
Collections of prints recommended to princes and great persons,
and why

ib
An hieroglyphical grammar
By whom draughts

and prints are celebrated for the institution
of youth

ib
La Martela taught all the sciences by cuts alone

ib
Commenius his orbis sensualium pictus celebrated
The universal language how to be most probably accomplished ib
Paffions expreflible by the art of Design

124
An useful caution for the lovers of these arts

I 20

now fold

121

122

125, 126

c H A P VI.
Of the new way of engraving, or mezzotinto, invented and
communicated by his

highness prince Rupert, &c. 127
An advantageous commutation for omitting the description of
the mechanical part of the vulgar graving

ib
A paradoxical graving without burin, point, or aqua fortis ib
The new mezzotirto invented by his highness Prince Rupert
enigmatically described, and why

129

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