The young child's lesson book; or, what shall i learn first?.

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1855
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Page 89 - And labours hard to store it well With the sweet food she makes. In works of labour or of skill I would be busy too: For Satan finds some mischief still For idle hands to do. In books, or work, or healthful play Let my first years be past, That I may give for every day Some good account at last.
Page 85 - Down in a green and shady bed A modest violet grew; Its stalk was bent, it hung its head, As if to hide from view. And yet it was a lovely flower, Its colors bright and fair!
Page 79 - THE ORPHAN BOY'S TALE. STAY, lady, stay, for mercy's sake, And hear a helpless orphan's tale ! Ah ! sure my looks must pity wake,.... 'T is want that makes my cheek so pale. Yet I was once a mother's pride, And my brave father's hope and joy ; But in the Nile's proud fight he died, And I am now an ORPHAN BOY.
Page 97 - The poor dispirited boy stole off to his seat, and bent 'his eyes again upon his lesson. ' It is no use. I cannot learn,' he said in a whisper to a companion who sat near him.
Page 79 - tis to be an orphan boy ! Oh, were I by your bounty fed ! — Nay, gentle lady, do not chide; Trust me, I mean to earn my bread, — The sailor's orphan boy has pride. Lady, you weep : — what is't you say ? You'll give me clothing, food, employ? Look down, dear parents ! look and see Your happy, happy orphan boy.
Page 79 - tis to be an orphan boy ! Oh ! were I by your bounty fed ! Nay, gentle lady, do not chide — Trust me, I mean to earn my bread; The sailor's orphan boy has pride. Lady, you weep! ha! this to me? You'll give me clothing, food, employ? Look down, dear parents ! look, and see Your happy, happy orphan boy...
Page 99 - ... without missing a word. The master cast on him a look of pleasure, as he handed him back his book, but said nothing. As the boy returned to his seat, his step was lighter, for his heart beat with a new impulse. " ' Did you say it ? ' whispered his kindhearted school-mate. (468) 4 " ' Every word,' replied the boy proudly. " ' Then you see you can learn.' "
Page 87 - That I careless and idle have been, I lie down as usual, and go to my rest, But feel discontented within. Then, as I don't like all the trouble I've had, In future I'll try to prevent it ; For I never am naughty without being sad, Or good without being contented.
Page 105 - Such are their natures and their passions such, But these disguise too little, those too much: So shall the man of power and pleasure see In his own slave as vile a wretch as he; In his luxurious lord the servant find His own low pleasures and degenerate mind: And each in all the kindred vices trace, Of a poor, blind, bewilder'd erring race, Who, a short time in varied fortune past, Die, and are equal in the dust at last.
Page 75 - Daily near my table steal, While I pick my scanty meal. Doubt not, little though there be, But I'll cast a crumb to thee...

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