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other is amorous on Hero,

father to break with him ow her, and but one visor

Laudio: I know him by his

signior Benedick? well; I am he.

are very near my brother ared on Hero; I pray you, ne is no equal for his birth : n honest man in it. 1 he loves her? swear his affection. d he swore he would marry

garland of? About your neck, like an usurer's chain? or under your arm, like a lieutenant's scarf? You must wear it one way, for the prince hath got your Hero.

Claud. I wish him joy of her. Bene. Why, that's spoken like an honest drover; so they sell bullocks. But did you think, the prince would have served you thus?

Claud. I pray you leave me.

Bene. Ho! now you strike like the blind man; 'twas the boy that stole your meat, and you'll beat the

Claud. If it will not be, I'll leave you. (Erit.

Bene. Alas, poor hurt fowl! Now will be creep into sedges.—But, that my lady Beatrice should know me, and not know me! The prince's foollHa! it may be, I go under that title, because I am merry-Yea; but so; I am apt to do myself wrong I am not so reputed: it is the base, the bitter dispa sition of Beatrice, that puts the world into her pel son, and so gives me out. Well, I'll be revenged

to the banquet.

Don John and Borachio. in name of Benedick, -ith the ears of Claudio. se wooes for himself. all other things, irs of love: ve use their own tongues ; or itself, eauty is a witch, Eh melteth into bloodt. rly proof, Farewell therefore, Hero!

Benedick,

D. Pedro. Now, signior, where's the count? DI you see him?

Bene. Troth, my lord, I have played the part lady Fame. I found him here as melancholy as lodge in a warren; I told him, and, I think, It him true, that your grace had got the good wil this young lady; and I offered him my comp to a willow tree, either to make him a garland, being forsaken, or to bind him up a rod, as bel worthy to be whipped.

D. Pedro. To be whipped! What's his fault?

Bene. The fiat transgression of a school-boy; being overjoy'd with finding a bird's nest, show his companion, and he stealsit.

ith me?

willow, about your own shion will you wear the

garland of? About your neck, like an usurer's chain ? or under your arm, like a lieutenant's scarf? You must wear it one way, for the prince hath got your Hero.

Claud. I wish him joy of her.

Bene. Why, that's spoken like an honest drover; so they sell bullocks. But did you think, the prince would have served you thus? Claud. I pray you,

leave me. Bene. Ho! now you strike like the blind man; 'twas the boy that stole your meat, and you'll beat

the post.

Claud. If it will not be, I'll leave you. [Erit.

Bene. Alas, poor hurt fowl! Now will he creep inlo sedges. But, that my lady Beatrice should know me, and not know me! The prince's fool ! Ha! it may be, I go under that title, because I am merry.-Yea; but so; I am apt to do myself wrong: I am not so reputed: it is the base, the bitter disposition of Beatrice, that puts the world into her person, and so gives me out. Well, I'll be revenged as I

may.

Re-enter Don Pedro, Hero, and Leonato.

D. Pedro. Now, signior, where's the count? Did you see him ?

Bene. Troth, my lord, I have played the part of lady Fame. I found him here as melancholy as a lodge in a warren ; I told him, and, I think, I told him true, that your grace had got the good will of this young lady; and I offered him my company to a willow tree, either to make him a garland, as being forsaken, or to bind him up a rod, as being worthy to be whipped.

D. Pedro. To be whipped! What's his fault?

Bene. The fiat transgression of a school-boy; who, being overjoy'd with finding a bird's nest, shows it his companion, and he steals it.

ABOUT NOTHING.

u make a trust a transgression?

the stealer. not been amiss, the rod had garland too; for the garland imself; and the rod he might who, as I take it, have stol'n

Re-enter Claudio and Beatrice.

t teach them to sing, and re-
r.
g answer your saying, by my

D. Pedro. Look, here she comes.

Bene. Will your grace command me any service
to the world's end? I will go on the slightest errand
now to the Antipodes, that you can devise to send
meon; I will fetch you a toothpicker now from the
farthest inch of Asia; bring you the length of Presut
John's foot; fetch you a liair off the great Chan's
beard; do you any embassage to the Pignirs, tatber
than hold three words' conference with this tarps:
You have no employment for me?

D. Pedro. None, but to desire your good cond-
pany.

Bene. O God, sir, here's a dish I love not; I cannot endure my lady Tongue.

(Erit. D. Pedro. Come, lady, come; you have lost the heart of signior Benedick,

Beat. Indeed, my lord, he lentit me a while; an

gave him use* for il, a double heart for his sing
one : marry, once before, he won it of me with fals
dice, therefore your grace may

well
say,

I hav
lost it,

D. Pedro. You have put him down, lady, you have put him down.

Beat. So I would not he should do me, my lord lest I should prove the mother of fools. I has brought count Claudio, whom you sent me to see

D. Pedro, Why, how now, counti whereiore a

- Beatrice hath a quarrel to hat danced with her, told her, y you. d me past the endurance of with one green leaf on it, her ; my very visor began to with her: She told me, not yself, that I was the prince's er thau a great thaw; hud. -ith such impossible* convey. pod like a man at a mark, with

at me: she speaks poniards, if her breath were as terrible ere were no living near her, he north star. I would not were endowed with all that etore he transgressed: she cules have turned spit; yea, co make the fire too. Coine, all find her the infernal Atét uld to God, some scholar

certainly, while she is here, – in hell, as in a sanctuary ; pose, because they would go Bisquiet, horror, and pertur

1

you sad?

Claud. Not sad, my lord.
D. Pedro. Ilow then? Sick?
Claud. Neither, my lord.

Beat. The count is neither sad nor sick, nor m
ry, nor well; but civil, count; civil as an oran
and something of that jealous complexion.

D. Pedro. I'faith, lady, I think your blazou

The Goddess of Discord.

* Interest.

CII

ion:

Re-enter Claudio and Beatrice.

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D. Pedro. Look, here she comes.

Bene. Will your grace command me any service to the world's end? I will go on the slightest errand now to the Antipodes, that you can devise to send me on; I will fetch you a toothpicker now from the farthest inch of Asia; bring you the length of Prester John's foot; fetch you a liair off the great Cham's beard; do you any embassage to the Pigrnies, rather than hold three words' conference with this harpy: You have no employment for me?

D. Pedro. None, but to desire your good com. pany.

Bene. O God, sir, here's a dish I love not; I cannot endure my lady Tongue.

(Erit. D. Pedro. Come, lady, come; you have lost the heart of signior Benedick.

Beat. Indeed, my lord, he leut it me a while; and 1

gave bim use" for il, a double heart for bis single one : marry, once before, he won it of me with false dice, therefore your grace may well say, I have lost it.

D. Pedro. You have put him down, lady, you have put him down.

Beat. So I would not he should do me, my lord, lest I should prove the mother of fools. I have brought count Claudio, whom you sent me to seek.

D. Pedro. Why, how now, count? wherefore are

you sad?

Claud. Not sad, my lord.
D. Pedro. Ilow then? Sick?
Claud. Neither, my lord.

Beut. The count is neither sad nor sick, nor mere ry, nor well: but civil, count; civil as an orange, and soinething of that jcalous complexion.

D. Pedro. l'faith, lady, I think your blazon to

# Interest.

Scene I. ABOUT NOTHING.

Beat. No, sure, my lord, my mother ayd; but
then there was a star danced, and under that was!
born.-

Cousins, God give you joy!
Leon. Niece, will you look to those things I told

you of?

H ADO

Act It. -worn, if he be so, his conceit

I have wooed in thy name, have broke with her father, ned: name the day of mar. e joy!

me my daughter, and with race hath made the match,

to it! tis

your cue*, perfectest herald of joy : I if I could say how much.-I am yours: I give away e upon the exchange. - or if you cannot, stop his Let him not speak, neither.

lady, you have a merry

Beat. I cry you mercy, uncle.—By your grace's pardon.

(Erit Beatrice. D. Pedro. By my troth, a pleasant-spirited lady.

Leon. There's little of the melancholy element in her, my lord: she is never sad, but when she sleeps; and not ever sad then; for I have heard my daughter say, she hath often dreamed of unhappiness, and waked herself with laughing.

D. Pedro. She cannot endure to hear tell of a busband.

Leon. O, by no means; she mocks all her wooers out of suit.

D. Pedro. She were an excellent wife for Bend

[graphic]

dick.

I thank it, poor fool, it keeps re:-My cousin tells him in

heart. oth, cousin.

alliance !-Thus goes every I, and I am sun-burned; I

cry, heigh ho! for a hus.

crice, I will get you one.
- have one of your father's
ce ne'er a brother like

you

? at husbands, if a maid could

have me, lady?
unless I might have another

grace is too costly to wear
ech your grace, pardon me;
mirth, and no matter.
ce most offends me, and to
you; for, out of question,

Iron. O lord, my lord, if they were but a wed married, they would talk themselves mad.

D. Pedro. Count Claudio, when mean you to to church?

Claud.. To-morrow, my lord : Time goes crutches, till love have all his rites.

Leon. Not till Monday, my dear son, which
hence a just seven-night; and a time too brief to
to have all things answer my mind.

D. Pedro. Come, you shake the head at so lon
breathing; but, I warrant thee, Claudio, the ti
shall not go dully by us; I will, in the interim,
dertake one of Hercules' labours; which is, to bi
signior Benedick, and the lady Beatrice into a mo
tain of affection, the one with the other. I wo
fain have it a match; and I doubt not but to fash
it, if you three will but minister such assistance
shall give you direction.

Leon. My lord, I am for you, though it cost
ten nights' watchings.

Claud. And I, my lord.
VOL. II.

y hour.

- among the players.

с

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