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ote this before my notes, anine that's worth the noting. ese are very crotchets that he

und noting!

[Music. air! now is his soul ravishthat sheep's guts should hale ies? Well, a horn for my mo

chief! I had as lief have heard the night-raven, come what plague could have come after it.

D. Pedro. Yea, marry; (To Claudio.).–Dost thou hear, Balthazar? I pray thee, get us some excellent music; for tomorrow night we would have it at the lady Hero's chamber-window.

Balth. The best I can, my lord. D. Pedro. Do so: farewell. [Exeunt Balthazar and music.] Come hither, Leonato: What was it you told me of to-day that your niece Beatrice was in love with signior Benedick?

Claud. O, ay :-Stalk on, stalk on; the fowl sits. (Aside to Pedro.] I did never think that lady would bave loved any man.

Leon. No, nor I neither; but most wonderful that she should so dote on signior Benedick, wbom she hath in all outward behaviours seemed ever to abhor. Bene. Is't possible? Sits the wind in that corner

(Asid Leon. By my troth, my lord, I cannot tell wha to think of it; but that she loves him with an ei Taged affection, it is past the infinite of thought.

D. Pedro. May be, she doth but counterfeit. Claud. 'Faith, like enough. Leon. O God! counterfeit! There never we counterfeit of passion came so near the life of passio as she discovers it.

D. Pedro. Why, what effects of passion shows sk! Claud. Bait the hook well; this fishi will bite.

(Asi Leon. What effects, my lord! She will sit

you You heard my daughter tell you how.

Claud. She did indeed.

D. Pedro. How, how, I pray you? You ama me: I would have thought her spirit had been ins cible against all assaults of affection.

2, ladies, sigh no more, deceivers ever; ea, and one on shore; ng constant never:

not so, zem go, blith and bonny; 2 your sounds of woe onny, nonny.

1. Hitties, sing no mo* dull and heavy; en was ever so, first was leavy. not so, ĝc.

a good song. , my lord, faith; thou singest well

had been a dog, that Lhey would have hanged bad voice bode no mis

er.

chief! I had as lief have heard the night-raven, comc what plague could have come after it.

D. Pedro. Yea, marry; (To Claudio.}-Dost thou hear, Balthazar? I pray thee, get us some excellent music; for to-morrow night we would have it at the lady Hero's chamber-window.

Balth. The best I can, my lord.

D. Pedro. Do so: farewell. (Ereunt Balthazar and music.] Come hither, Leonato: What was it you told me of to-day? that your niece Beatrice was in love with signior Benedick ?

Claud. O, ay:-Stalk on, stalk on; the fowl sits. (Aside to Pedro.] I did never think that lady would have loved any man.

Leon. No, por I neither; but most wonderful, that she should so dote on signior Benedick," whom she hath in all outward behaviours seemed ever to abhor. Bene. Is't possible? Sits the wind in that corner?

[Aside. Leon. By my troth, my lord, I cannot tell what to think of it; but that she loves him with an enraged affection, it is past the infinite of thought..

D. Pedro. May be, she doth but counterfeit.
Claud. 'Faith, like enough.

Leon. O God! counterfeit! There never was counterfeit of passion came so near the life of passion, as she discovers it.

D. Pedro. Why, what effects of passion shows she?
Claud. Bait the hook well; this fish will bite.

(Aside. Leon. What effects, my lord! She will sit you,-You heard my daughter tell you how.

Claud. She did indeed. D. Pedro. How, how, I pray you? You amaze me: I would have thought her spirit had been invincible against all assaults of affection.

1

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e sworn it had, my lord; especk. hould think this a gull, but that low speaks it: koavery cannot, ch reverence. Fen the infection; hold it up.

(Aside. e made her affection known to

ears she never will: that's her

deed; so your daughter says: - have so oft encounter'd him im that I love him? e now when she is beginning she'll be up twenty times a she sit in her smock, till she erimmy daughter tells us all. k of a sheet of

paper, rememEaughter told us of.

had writ it, and was reading edick and Beatrice between

D. Pedro. It were good that Benedick knew of it by some other, if she will not discover it.

Claud. To what end? He would make but a sport of it, and torment the poor lady worse.

D. Pedro. An he should, it were an alms to hang, him: she's au excellent sweet lady; and, out of all suspicion, she is virtuous.

Claud. And she is exceeding wise.

D. Pedro. In every thing, but in loving Benedick.

Leon. O my lord, wisdom and blood combating in so tender a body, we have ten proofs to one, that blood hath the victory. I am sorry for ber as I have just cause, being her uncle and her guardian.

D. Pedro. I would she had bestowed this dotage on me; I would have daff’de all other respects, and made her half myself: I pray you, tell Benedick of it, and hear what he will say.

Leon, Were it good, think you?

Claud. Hero thinks surely, she will die: for sh says, she will die if he love her not; and she will d ere she makes her love known: and she will die if woo her, rather than she will 'bate one breath of he accustomed crossness.

D. Pedro. She hath well: if she should mal tender of her love, 'tis very possible be'll scorni for the mau, as you know all, hath a contemptibl spirit.

Cluud. He is a very propert man.

D. Pedro. He hath, indeed, a good outward ha piness.

Claud. 'Fore God, and in my mind, very wise.

D. Pedro. He doth, indeed, show some sparks th are like wit.

Leon. And I take him to be valiant.

D. Pedro. As Hector, I assure you: and in managing of quarrels yon may say he is wise;

e letter into a thousand halfF, that she should be so immo. t she knew would flout her: e, by my own spirit; for I writ to me; yea, though I

upon her knees she falls, eart, tears her hair, prays, ck! God give me patience! ed; my daughter says so: much overborne her, that my aid she will do a desperate very true.

on of mind.

Thrown off. Handsome.

+ Contemptuous.

C2

Act II ; espe

but that Caboch

it up Aside TOWO LO

t's her

says: him

eining nesa she

.

D. Pedro. It were good that Benedick knew of it by some other, if she will not discover it.

Claud. To wliat end? He would make but a sport of it, and torment the poor lady worse.

D. Pedro. An he should, it were an alms to hang him: slie's au excellent sweet lady; and, out of all suspicion, she is virtuous.

Cluud. And she is exceediug wise.

D. Pedro. In every thing, but in loving Benedick.

Leon. O my lord, wisdom and blood combating in so tender a body, we have ten proofs to one, that blood hath the victory. I am sorry for her as I have just cause, being her uncle and her guardian.

D. Pedro. I would she had bestowed this dotage on me; I would have daff’d* all other respects, and made her half myself: I pray you, tell Benedick of it, and hear what he will say.

Leon. Were it good, think you?

Claud. Hero thinks surely, she will die: for she says, she will die if he love her not; and she will die ere she makes her love known: and she will die if he woo her, rather than she will 'bate one breath of her accustomed crossness.

D. Pedro. She hath well: if she should make tender of her love, 'is very possible he'll orn it; for the man, as you kvow all, hath a contemptiblet spirit.

Claud. He is a very propert man.

D. Pedro. He hatlı, indeed, a good outward happiness.

Claud. 'fore God, and in my mind, very wise.

D. Pedro. He doth, indeed, show some sparks that are like wit.

Leon. And I take him to be yaliant.

D. Pedro. As Hector, I assure you: and in the managing of quarrels you may say he is wise; for

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* Thrown off.
IIIandsome.

+ Contemptuous.

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Scene III. ABOUT NOTHING. say, I will bear myself proudly, if I perceive the love come from ber; they say too, that she will rather die thau give any sign of affection. I did never think to marty:–1 must not seem proud: -Happy are they that hear their detractions, and can put them to mending. They say, the lady is fair; 'is a truth, I can bear them witness: and virtuous ; so, 1 cannot reprove it; and wise, but for loving me:- By my troth, it is no addition to her wituar no great argument of her folly, for I will be horribly in love with her.-I may chance have some odd quirks and remnants of wit broken on me, bel cause I have railed so long against marriage:-Bul doth not the appetite alter! A man loves the mea in his youth, that he cannot endure in his age: shall quips, and sentences, and these paper bullets the brain, awe a man from the career of his humoul No: the world must be peopled. When I said, would die a bachelor, 1 did not think I slioulai till I were married.—Here comes Beatrice; By day, she's a fair lady: I do syy some marks of la in her.

Beat. Against my will, I am sent to bid you c in to dinner.

Bene. Fair Beatrice, I thank you for your pa

Beat. I took no more pains for those thanks you take pains to thank me; if it had been y I would not have come.

Bene. You take pleasure in the message!

Beat. Yea, just so much as you may take knife's point, and choke a daw withal :-Yo no stomach, signior: fare you well.

Bene. Ha! Against my will I am sent you come to dinner--there's a double me that. I took no more pains for those thayou took pains to thank me-that's as say, Any pains that I take for you is

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