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Dogb. Why then, let them alone till they are sober; if they make yon not then the better answer, you may say, they are not the men you took them for.

2 Hatch. Well, sir.

Dogb. If you meet a thief, you may suspect him, by virtue of your office, to be no true man; and, for such kind of men, the less you meddle or make with them, why, the more is for your honesty.

2 Watch. If we know him to be a thicf, shall we pot lay hands on him ?

Dugb. Truly, by your office, you may; but I think, they that touch pitch will be defiled: the most peaceable way for you, if you do take a thief, is, to let him show himself what he is, and steal out of your company.

Verg. You have been always called a merciful man, partner.

Dogb. Truly, I would not hang a dog by my will; much more a man who hath any honesty in him.

Verg. If you hear a child cry in the night, you must call to the nurse, and bid her still it.

2 Watch. How if the nurse be asleep, and will not hear us?

Dogb. Why then depart in peace, and let the child wake her with crying: for the ewe that will not hear her lamb when it baes, will never answer a calf when he bleats.

Verg. 'Tis very true.

Dogb. This is the end of the charge. You, constable, are to present the prince's own person; if you meet the prince in the night, you may stay him.

Verg. Nay by'r lady, that I think he cannot.

Dogb. Five shillings to one on't, with any man that knows the statues, he may stay him: marry, not without the prince be willing : for, indeed, the watch ought to offend no man; and it is an offence to stay a man against his will.

Verg. Ky'r lady, I think, it be so.
Dogb. IIa, ha, ha! Well, masters, good night:

I ADO

Act III.

of weight chances, call up
unsels and your own, and
abour.
rs, we hear our charge :
he church.bench till two,

honest neighbours: I pray · Leonato's door; for the orrow, there is a great coil at, I beseech you. unt Dogberry und Verges.

and Conrade.

(Aside.

t thy elbow. elbow itched; I thought

Scene III. ABOUT NOTHING.
Con. Yes, it is apparel.
Bore. I mean the fashion,
Con. Yes, the fashion is the fashion.

Bora. Tosh! I may as well say, the fool's the
fool. But see'st thou not what a deformed thief this
fashion is?

Watch. I know that Deformed; he has been a
vile thief this seven year; he goes up and down like a
gentleman: I remember bis name.
Bora. Didst thou not hear somebody?
Con. No; 'twas the vane on the house.

Bora. Seest thou not, I say, what a deformed
thief this fashion is? how giddily he turns about all
the hot bloods, between fourteen and five and thir.
ty sometime, fashioning them like Pharoali's sol.
diers in the reechy painting; sometime, like god
Bel's priests in the old church window, sometime,
like the shaven Hercules in the spischede wort
eaten tapestry, where bis cod piece seems as assy
as his club?

Con. All this I see; and see, that the fashion
wears out more apparel than the man: but art not
thou thyself giddy with the fashion ton, that thou
bast shifted out of thy tale into telling me of the
fashion?

Bora. Not so neither: but know, that I have to
night wooed Margaret, the lady Hero's gentie-wo-
man, by the name of Hero; she leans me out at ber
mistress' chamber-window, bids me a thousand times
good night,--I tell this tale vilely:-I should first
tell thee, how the priuce, Claudio, and my master,
planted and placed, and possessed by my master
Don John, saw afar off in the orcbard this amiable
encounter,
Con. And thought they, Margaret was Hero?
Bora. Two of them did, the prince and Claudio ;
but the devil my master knew she was Margaret;
and partly by his oaths, which first possessed them,

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answer for that; and now

en under this penthouse, will, like a true drunkard,

zason, masters; yet stand

[graphic]

I have earned of Don

any villainy should be so

ther ask, if it were possi

riclı; for when such viles, poor ones may make

art unconfirmed*: thou fa doublet, or a hat, or -

ays of the world.

Smoked.

Soiled,

Con. Yes, it is apparel.
Bora. I mean the fashion.
Con. Yes, the fashion is the fashion.

Bora. Tush! I may as well say, the fool's the fool, But see'st thou not what a deformed thief this fashion is?

Watch. I know that Deformed; he has been a vile thief this seven year; he goes up and down like a gentleman: I remember his name.

Bora. Didst thou not hear somebody?
Con. No; 'twas the vane on the liouse.

Bora. Seest thou not, I say, what a deformed thief this fashion is ? how giddily he turns about all the hot bloods, hetween fourteen and five and thirty? sometime, fashioning them like Pharoah's soldiers in the reechy* painting ; sometime, like god Bel's priests in the old church window; sometime, like the shaven Hercules in the smirchedt worul. eaten tapestry, where his cod.piece seems as massy as his club?

Con. All this I see; and see, that the fashion wears out more apparel than the man: but art not thou thyself giddy with the fashion too, that thou bast shifted out of thy tale into telling me of the fashion ?

Bora. Not so neither: but know, that I have to. night wooed Margaret, the lady Hero's gentle-woman, by the name of Hero : she leans me out at her mistress' chamber-window, bids me a thousand times good night I tell this tale vilely:-. I should first tell thee, how the prince, Claudio, and my master, planted and placed, and possessed by my master Don John, saw afar off in the orchard this amiable encounter.

Con. And thought they, Margaret was Hero?

Bora. Two of them did, the prince and Claudio; but the devil my master knew she was Margaret; and partly by his oaths, which first possessed them,

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HADO

Act III. which did deceive them, zy, which did contirm any ad made, away went ClauTould meet her as he was

at the temple, and there, tion, shame her with what end her home again with

jou in the prince's name

Scene IV. ABOUT NOTHING.

Marg. Troth, I think, your other rabata were
better.
Hero. No, pray thee, good Meg, I'll weat thin.

Marg. By my troth, it's not so good; and I mu.
rant, your cousin will say so.

Hero. My cousin's a fool, and thou art another;
I'll wear none but this.

Marg. I like the new tiret within excellently, if
the hair were a thought browner: and your gown's
a most rare fashion, i'faith. I saw the duchess of
Milan's gown, that they praise so.

Hero. O, that exceeds, they say.

Marg. By my troth it's but a night-gown in te
spect of yours: Cloth of gold, and cuts, and laced
with silver; set with pearls, down sleeves, side
sleevest, and skirts round, underborne with a blue
ish finsel: but for a fine, quaint, graceful, and er
cellent fashion, yours is worth ten on't.

Hero. God give me joy to wear it, for my heart
is exceeding heavy!

Marg. 'Twill be heavier soon, by the weight of a

ight master constable : we most daugerous piece of un in the commonwealth. Formed is one of them; I

de briug Deformed forth,

- we charge you, let us

man,

ove a goodly commodity,
a's bills.
uestion, I warrant you.

[Exeunt.

Hero. Fie upon thee! art rot ashamed ?

Marg. Of what, lady? of speaking bonourably?
Is not marriage honourable in a beggar? Is not
your lord honourable without marriage? I think
you would have me say, saving your reverence,
husband : au bad thinking do not wrest true speak.
ing, I'll offend nobody: Is there any harm in-the
heavier for a husband ? None, I think, an if it be
the right husband, and the right wife; otherwise'tis
light, and not heavy: Ask my lady Beatrice else,
here she comes.

IV.

nato's house.

ret, and Ursula.

ke my cousin Beatrice,

Enter Beatrice.

Hero. Good morrow, 20%.
Beat. Good morrow, sweet Hero.

hither.

(Erit Ursula.

* A kind of rulf,

Long-sleeves.
VOL. II.

Head-dress,

D

Marg. Troth, I think, your other rabato* were better.

Hero. No, pray thee, good Meg, I'll wear this.

Marg. By my troth, it's not so good; and I war. rant, your cousin will say so.

Hero. My cousin's a fool, and thou art another; I'll wear none but this.

Marg. I like the new tiret within excellently, if the hair were a thought browner: and your gown's a most rare fashion, i'faith. I saw the duchess of Milan's gown, that they praise so.

Hero. O, that exceeds, they say.

Marg. By my troth it's but a night-gown in respect of yours: Cloth of gold, and cuts, and laced with silver; set with pearls, down sleeves, sidesleevest, and skirts round, underborne with a blue. ish tinsel : but for a fine, quaint, graceful, and excellent fashion, yours is worth ten on't.

Hero. God give me joy to wear it, for my heart is exceeding heavy!

Marg. 'Twill be heavier soon, by the weight of a

man.

Hero. Fie upon thee! art not ashamed ?

Marg. Of what, lady? of speaking bonourably? Is not marriage honourable in a beggar? Is not your lord honourable without marriage? I think you would have me say, saving your reverence,ma husband : ay bad thinking do not wrest true speak. ing, I'll offend nobody: Is there any harm in--the heavier for a husband ? None, I think, an if it be the right husband, and the right wife; otherwise 'tis light, and not heavy: Ask my lady Beatrice else, here she comes.

Enter Beatrice
Hero. Good morrow, coz..
Beat. Good morrow, sweet Hero.

+ Headdress.

A kind of ruff,

$ Long sleeves. VOL. II.

D

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