Beyond the Atmosphere: Early Years of Space Science

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Scientific and Technical Information Branch, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1980 - Astronautics - 497 pages
 

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Page 83 - The heavens themselves, the planets, and this centre, Observe degree, priority, and place, Insisture, course, proportion, season, form, Office, and custom, in all line of order...
Page 309 - June simultaneously with, but outside of, meetings of the Scientific and Technical Subcommittee of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space — led to a draft agreement 8 June 1962.
Page 143 - Observatory (fig. 18) — consisted of very heavy, complex, accurately stabilized spacecraft. Weights ranged from several hundreds of kilograms to tons. The much greater size and weight of the observatories permitted more scientific payload and more sophisticated instrumentation. They could devote a considerable weight to what was called "housekeeping" equipment — power supplies, temperature control, and tracking and telemetering equipment. As with the Orbiting Geophysical Observatory, there might...
Page 427 - ... astronaut crews. The Administrator of NASA recently met with the space authorities of Western Europe, Canada, Japan and Australia in an effort to find ways in which we can cooperate more effectively in space. It is important, I believe, that the space program of the United States meet these six objectives. A program which achieves these goals will be a balanced space program, one which will extend our capabilities and knowledge and one which will put our new learning to work for the immediate...
Page 437 - Eugene M. Emme, Aeronautics and Astronautics: An American Chronology of Science and Technology in the Exploration of Space, 1915-1960 (Washington: NASA, 1961...
Page 51 - In view of the great importance of observations during extended periods of time of extraterrestrial radiations and geophysical phenomena in the upper atmosphere and in view of the advanced state of present rocket techniques, the CSAGI recommends that thought be given to the launching of small satellite vehicles, to their scientific instrumentation, and to the new problems associated with satellite experiments, such as power supply, telemetering, and orientation of the vehicle...
Page 49 - The main aim is to learn more about the fluid envelope of our planet — the atmosphere and oceans — over all the earth and at all heights and depths. The atmosphere, especially at its upper levels, is much affected by disturbances on the Sun; hence this also will be observed more closely and continuously than hitherto. Weather, the ionosphere, the earth's magnetism, the polar lights, cosmic rays, glaciers all over the world, the size and form of the earth, natural and man-made radioactivity in...
Page 226 - NASA was grossly understaffed for its projected plans in the university area, and in particular to match the performance of the Office of Naval Research, the National Science Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health in working with universities.
Page 239 - The first four of these became under NASA the Langley, Ames, Lewis, and Flight Research Centers, the research orientation of which Deputy Administrator Hugh Dryden was so desirous of protecting. Wallops Station was assigned primarily to the space science program. To the former NACA installations, NASA added six more: the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland; the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena; the John F. Kennedy Space Center at Merritt Island, Florida; the George C. Marshall...
Page 75 - Wavelength (angstroms) 2900 2950 Figure 6. Solar spectrum. Solar intensities above the ozonosphere at White Sands, New Mexico. Spectrum of 7 March 1947, replotted on a linear intensity scale relative to the intensity of a black body at 6000 K. Durand et al, Astrophysical Journal 109 (1949): 1-16. Illustration courtesy of the Astrophysical Journal, published by the University of Chicago Press, copyright 1949, The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. took to adapt the propagation techniques...

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