Historia Naturalis Testaceorum Britanniae, Or, The British Conchology: Containing the Descriptions and Other Particulars of Natural History of the Shells of Great Britain and Ireland: Illustrated with Figures. In English and French

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author, 1778 - Engraving - 254 pages
 

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Page 160 - This brood and other oysters they carry to creeks of the sea, at Brickel Sea, Mersey, Langno, Fingrego, Wivenho, Tolesbnry, and Saltcoase, and there throw them into the channel, Which they call their beds or layers, where they grow and fatten, and in two or three years the smallest brood will be oysters of the size aforesaid.
Page 161 - The reason of the scarcity of oysters, and consequently of their dearness, is, because they are of late years bought up by the Dutch. There are great penalties by the Admiralty Court laid upon...
Page 160 - ... oysters that are put into them, in four or five days ; though they commonly let them continue there six weeks or two months, in which time they will be of a dark green. To prove that the...
Page 161 - Sub«'ftancc in the Fin. They are fait in the Pits, falter *- in the Layers, but falteft at Sea.
Page 161 - There are great penalties by the Admiralty Court laid upon those that fish out of those grounds which the Court appoints, or that destroy the cultch, or that take any oysters that are not of size, or that do not tread under their feet, or throw upon the shore a fish which they call a Five-finger, resembling a spur-rowel, because that fish gets into the oysters when they gape, and sucks them out.
Page i - Britannias; or the British Conchology; containing the Descriptions and other Particulars of Natural History of the Shells of Great Britain and Ireland, in English and French ; 4to, 17 plates, containing figures of above 200 Shells, half -bound, 18s.
Page 159 - ... two shells being shut, a fair shilling will rattle between them. The places where the oysters are chiefly catched, are called the Pont Burnham, Maiden, and Colne Waters ; the latter taking its name from the river of Colne, which passeth by Colne Chester, gives the name to that town, and runs into a creek of the sea at a place called the Hythe, being the suburbs of the town.
Page 159 - It is probably conjectured that the spat in twenty-four hours begins to have a shell. In the month of May, the dredgers (by the law of the Admiralty Court) have liberty to catch all manner of oysters, of what size soever.
Page 159 - May the dredgers (by the law of the admiralty-court) have liberty to catch all manner of oyfters, of what fize foever. When they have taken them, with a knife they...
Page 159 - ... spats. After the month of May it is felony to carry away the cultch, and punishable to take any other oysters, unless it be those of size (that is to say) about the bigness of an half-crown piece, or when, the two shells being shut, a fair shilling will rattle between them.

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