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when once thus formed might subsequently slowly‘kiread to other districts. On the above principle, nurserymen always prefer getting seed from a large body of plants of the same variety, as the chance of intercrossing with other varieties is thus lessened.

Even in the case of slow-breeding animals, which unite for each birth, we must not overrate the effects of intercrosses in retarding natural selection; for I can bring a

,considerable catalogue of facts, showing that within the same area, varieties of the same animal can long remain distinct, from haunting different stations, from breeding at slightly different seasons, or from varieties of the same kind preferring to pair together. .

Intergossingd plays a very important part in natur' in keeping the individfiarsgiifihéisamespéensfiiggme same variety, true and uniform in character. It will obviously thus act far more efficiently with those animals which unite for each birth ; but I have already attempted to show that we have reason to believe that occasional intercrosses take place with all animals and with all plants. Even if these take place only at long intervals, the young thus produced will gain so much in vigour and fertility over the offspring from long-continued. self-fertilisation, that they will have a better chance of surviving and propagating their kind; and thus, in the long run, the influence of intercrosses, even at rare intervals, will be great. If there exist organic beings which never intercross, uniformity of character can be retained amongst them, as long as their conditions of life remain the same, only through the principle of inheritance, and through natural selection destroying any which depart from the proper type ; but if their conditions of life change and they undergo modification, uniformity of character can be given to their modified offspring, solely by natural selection preserving the same favourable variations.

Isolation, alsozwis an important elgmgtvjnthgum of naturaIIEelfgtwi'on, In a confined or isolated area, if

~*not“vefy"Tai":'ge, the organic and inorganic conditions of life will generally be in a great degree uniform; so that natural selection will tend to modify all the individuals of a varying species throughout the area in the same manner in relation to the same conditions. Intercrosses, also, with the individuals of the same species, which otherwise would have inhabited the surrounding and differently circumstanced districts, will be prevented. But isolation probably acts more efficiently in checking the immigrafinntor betteriadapted organisms, after any physicaTYh'arigefsuch'as of climate or. elevation of the lentils; placesin thev natural econom OiiihLmuntrykareieft/Hopen for the old inhabitants '% struggle tor,_and become adapted to, through modifications in_ ilflllilmctummvconstitution. Lastly, isolation, by checking immigration and consequently competition, will give time for any new variety to be slowly improved; and this may sometimes be of importance in the production of new species. If, however, an isolated area be very small, either from being surrounded by barriers, or from having very peculiar physical conditions, the total number of the individuals supported on it will necessarily be very small ; and fewness of individuals will greatly retard the production of new species through natural selection, by decreasing the chance of the appearance of favourable variations.

The mere lapse of time by itself does nothing either for or' against natural selection. I state this because it has been erroneously asserted that the element of time is assumed by me to play an all-important part in natural selection, as if all species were necessarily undergoing slow modification from some innate law. Lapse of time is only so far highly important, as it gives a better chance of beneficial variations arising, being selected, accumulated, and fixed, in relation to the slowly changing organic and inorganic conditions of life. It likewise favours the direct action of new or changed physical conditions of life.

If we turn to nature to test the truth of these remarks, and look at any small isolated area, such as an oceanic island, although the total number of the species inhabiting it, wilhbe found to be small, as we shall see in our chapter on Geographical Distribution; yet of these species a very large proportion are endemic,——that is, have been produced there, and nowhere else. Hence an oceanic island at first sight seems to have been highly favourable for the production of new species. But we may thus greatly deceive ourselves, for to ascertain whether a small isolated area, or a large open area like a continent, has been most favourable for the production of new organic forms, we ought to make the comparison within equal times ; and this we are incapable of doing.

Although isolation is of considerable importance in the production of new species, on the whole I am inclined to believe that largeness of area is of more importance, especially in the production of species, which will prove capable of enduring for a long period, and of spreading widely. Throughout a great and open area, not only will there be a better chance of favourable variations arising from the large number of individuals of the same species there supported, but the conditions of life are infinitely complex from the large number

i' of already existing species; and if some of these many ‘ species become modified and improved, others will have to be improved in a corresponding degree or they will be exterminated./ Each new form, also, as soon as it has been much improved, will be able to .1 spread over the open and'continuous area, and will thus come into competition with many others. Hence ti more new places will be formed, and the competition to ‘ fill them will be more severe, on a large than on a small and isolated area. Moreover, great areas, though now continuous, owing to oscillations of level, will often / have recently existed in a broken condition, so that the good effects of isolation will generally, to a certain extent, have concurred. Finally, I conclude that, although small isolated areas probably have been in some respects highly favourable for the production of new species, yet that the course of modification will generally have been more rapid on large areas; and what is more j, important, that the new forms produced on large areas, which already have been victorious over many competitors, will be those that will spread most widely, will give rise to most new varieties and species, and will thus play the most important part in the changing history of the organic world.

We can, perhaps, on these views, understand some facts which will be again alluded to in our chapter on Geographical Distribution; for instance, that the productions of the smaller continent of Australia have formerly yielded, and apparently are now yielding, before those of the larger Europaao-Asiatic area. Thus, also, it is that continental productions have everywhere become so largely naturalised on islands. On a small island, the race for life will have been less severe, and there will have been less modification and less extermination. Hence, perhaps, it comes that the flora of Madeira, according to Oswald

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Beer, resembles the extinct tertiary flora of Europe. All fresh-water basins, taken together, make a small area compared with that of the sea or; of the land; and, consequently, the competition between fresh—water pro— ductions will have been less severe than elsewhere; new forms will have been more slowly formed, and old forms more slowly exterminated. And it is in fresh water that we find seven genera of Ganoid fishes, remnants of a once preponderant order: and in fresh water we find some of the most anomalous forms now known in the world, as the Ornithorhynchus and Lepidosiren, which, like fossils, connect to a certain extent orders now widely separated in the natural scale. These anomalous forms may almost be called living fossils; they have endured to the present day, from having inhabited a confined area, and from having thus been exposed to less severe competition.

To sum up the circumstances favourable and unfavourable to natural selection, as far as the extreme intricacy of the subject permits. I conclude that for terrestrial productions a large continental area, which has undergone many oscillations 0f level, and which consequently has existed for long periods in a broken condition, has been the most favourable for the‘ production of many new forms of life, fitted to endure long and to spread widely. For the area first existed as a continent, and the inhabitants, at this period numerous in individuals and kinds, will have been subjected to very severe competition. When converted by subsidence into large separate islands, there will still have existed' many individuals of the same species on each island: ’intercrossing on the confines of the range of each species will thus have been checked: after physical changes of any kind, immigration will have been prevented, so that new places in the polity of each island will have had to be filled up by modifications of the old inhabitants; and time will have been allowed for the varieties in each to become well modified and perfected, When, by renewed elevation, the islands were reconverted into a continental area, there will again have been severe competition: the most favoured or improved varieties will have been enabled to spread: there will have been much extinction of the less improved forms, and the relative proportional numbers of the various inhabitants of the renewed continent will again have been changed; and again there will have been a

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fair field for natural selection to improve still further the inhabitants, and thus produce new species.

That natural selection will always act with extreme slowness I fully admit. Its action depends on there being places in the polity of nature, which can be better occupied by some of the inhabitants of the country undergoing modification of some kind. The existence of such places will often depend on physical changes, which are generally very slow, and on the immigration of better adapted forms having been checked. But the action of natural selection will probably still oftener depend on some few of the inhabitants becoming slowly modified; the mutual relations of many of the other inhabitants being thus disturbed. Nothing can be effected, unless favourable variations occur, and variation itself is apparently always a slow process. The process will often be greatly retarded by free intercrossing. Many will exclaim that these several causes are amply sufficient wholly to stop the action of natural selection. I do not believe so. On the other hand, I do believe that natural selection always acts very slowly, often only at long intervals of time, and generally on only a -very few of the inhabitants of the same region at the same time. I further believe, that this slow, intermittent action of natural selection accords

'perfectly well with what geology tells us of the rate- and

manner at which the inhabitants of the world have changed. . '

Slow though the process of selection may be, if feeble man can do much by his powers of artificial selection, I can see no limit to the amount of change, to the beauty and infinite complexity of the coadaptations between all organic beings, one with another and with their physical conditions of life, which may be effected in the long course of time by nature’s power of selection.

Extinction—This subject will be more fully disCussed in our chapter on Geology; but it must be here alluded to from being intimately connected with natural selection. Natural seleqiflaaats.solelytihmughwthg PTQSQWafiOIl of . variatipnislminnsomewway—advantageouslfifliich con—v sequently endure. From the high geometrical ratio of increase of all organic beings, each area is already stocked with the full number of its existing inhabitants, and as most areas are already stocked with a great diversity of forms, it fmollszmntliatv.aslgashmselecmdeaWurea

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