The Fishguard Invasion by the French in 1797: Some Passages Taken from the Diary of the Late Reverend Daniel Rowlands

Front Cover
T.F. Unwin, 1892 - Fishguard (Wales) - 234 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 150 - The superiority of the force under my command, which is hourly increasing, must prevent my treating upon any terms short of your surrendering your whole force prisoners of war. I enter fully into your wish of preventing an unnecessary effusion of blood, which your speedy surrender can alone prevent, and which will entitle you to that consideration, it is ever the wish of the British troops to show an enemy whose numbers are inferior.
Page 150 - The superiority* of the force under my command, which is hourly increasing, must prevent my treating upon any other terms short of your surrendering your whole force prisoners of war. I enter fully into your wish of preventing an unnecessary effusion of blood, which your speedy surrender can alone prevent, and which will entitle you to that consideration it is ever the wish of British troops to show an enemy whose numbers are inferior.
Page 145 - Cardigan Bay, 5th of Ventose, " 5th year of the Republic. " SIR, — The circumstances under which the body of the French troops under my command were landed at this place render it unnecessary to attempt any military operations, as they would tend only to bloodshed and pillage. The officers of the whole corps have therefore intimated their desire of entering into a negotiation, upon principles of humanity, for a surrender.
Page 17 - The fatigue we have experienced will, I trust, excuse me to your Grace for not giving a more particular detail ; but my anxiety to do justice to the Officers and men I had the honour to command will induce me to attend your Grace, with as little delay as possible, to state their merits, and at the same time to give you every information in my power upon this subject. The spirit of loyally which has pervaded all ranks throughout this country, is infinitely beyond what 1 can express. I am, &c. CAWDOR.
Page 14 - HAVE the honour and pleasure to inform your Grace, that the whole of the French troops, amounting to near fourteen hundred men, have surrendered, and are now on their march to Haverfordwest. I have taken the first opportunity of announcing this good news to your Grace, and shall have the honour of writing again to your Grace by tomorrow's post.
Page 16 - Grace, together with my anfwer: in confequence of which they determined to furrender themfelves prifoners of war, and accordingly laid down their arms this day at two o'clock. I cannot at this moment inform your Grace of the exafl number of prifoners, but I believe it to be their whole force.
Page 9 - Note. — The authorities for this paper are : — 1st. " An Authentic Account of the Invasion by the French Troops (under the command of General Tate) on Carrig Gwasted point, near Fishguard, Wednesday, the 22nd day of February 1797, and their surrender to the forces of His Britannic Majesty, on Goodwick Sands, on Friday, the 24th of February; likewise some occurrences connected therewith. Never before published. Haverfordwest : Joseph Potter, printer, High Street, 1842.
Page 22 - Wales tho' the indignation of the people was great, I found my influence would protect them without difficulty. The women were more clamorous than the men, making signs to cut their throats, and desiring I would not take the trouble of carrying them further. All the military assistance I could get at Oxford as a guard for the night was a sergeant of your friend and landlord, and two recruits, but I had no apprehension of their escape as their remain (sic] with us was the only thing that ensured their...
Page 16 - Grace of the exact number of prisoners, but I believe it to be their whole force. It is my intention to march them this night to Haverfordwest, where I shall make the best distribution in my power. The frigates, corvette, and lugger got under weigh yesterday evening, and were this morning entirely out of sight. The fatigue we have experienced will, I trust, excuse me to your Grace for not giving a more particular detail: but my anxiety to do justice to the officers and men I had the honour to command,...
Page 14 - I have the honour and pleasure to inform your Grace that the whole of the French troops, amounting to near fourteen hundred men, have surrendered, and are now on their march to Haverfordwest. I have taken...

Bibliographic information