The true nature of imposture, fully displayed in the life of Mahomet: with a discourse annexed for the vindication of Christianity from the charge of imposture : offered to the consideration of the deists of the present age

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W. Baynes, 1808 - Deism - 231 pages
 

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This book, though difficult to read in it's original Old English, is the most eye-opening and true biography of Muhammed's life. Prideaux has a very extensive reference guide in the back, some of whose author's don't even have surviving works, also most of whom are Arabic historians. If you want an easier to read version pick up http://www.lulu.com/shop/abu-prideaux-bin-sulayman/tyrannys-apostle/ebook/product-17532439.html which is a direct translation from Old to Modern English written by a very intellegent and well-versed Special Forces Major. 

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Page 19 - ... corruption of their manners, exceedingly given to the love of women ; and the scorching heat and dryness of the country, making rivers of water, cooling drinks, shaded gardens, and pleasant fruits, most refreshing and delightful unto them, they were from hence apt to place their highest enjoyment in things of this nature.
Page 78 - Battel was fought betwen them, the confequence of which was, that neither fide gaining any advantage over the other, they there agreed on a Truce for Ten Years. The Conditions of which were, That all within Mecca who were for Mahomet, might have liberty to join themfelves to him ; and on the other fide, Thofe with Mahomet , who had a mind to leave him, and return to their Houfes in Mecca, might alfo have the fame liberty. But for the future, if any of the Citizens of Mecca fhould go over to Mahomet...
Page 51 - ... to propagate it in that town. In this they laboured abundantly, and with such success, that in a short time they drew over the greatest part of the inhabitants; of which Mahomet receiving an account, resolved to go thither immediately, finding it unsafe to continue any longer at Mecca. On the 12th day of the month, which the Arabs call the Former Rabia, that is, on the 24th of our September, he came to Yathreb, and was received with great acclamations by the party which called him thither.
Page 150 - God has written in the hearts of every one of us from the first creation ; and if it varies from it in any one particular, if it...
Page 5 - Korashites, which was reckoned the noblest in all that country; and was descended in a direct line from Pher Koraish, the founder of it. Yet in the beginning of his life he was in a very poor condition ; for his father dying before he was two years old, and while his grandfather was still living, all the power and wealth of his family devolved to his uncles, especially Abu Taleb. Abu Taleb, after the death of his father, bore the chief sway in Mecca...
Page 229 - Jude ; the second of St. Peter, the second and third of St. John, and the Revelation.
Page 20 - Ah ! then he must have led an evil life indeed," said Hollister ; " the blessed in spirit lie quiet until the general muster at the last day, but wickedness disturbs the soul in this life as well as in that which is to come.
Page 23 - This objection he endeavoured to evade by several answers ; all of which amount only to this, " that God had sent Moses and Jesus with miracles, and yet men would not be obedient to their word ; and therefore he had now sent him in the last place without miracles, to force them by the power of the sword to do his will.
Page 73 - Mahometans ever fince, and enforced efpecially in their wars; where, it muft' be owned, nothing can be more conducive to make them fight valiantly, than a fettled opinion, that, whatever dangers they expofe themfelves to, they cannot die either fooner or later than is...
Page 44 - Mecca, in the same manner as he brought him thence.; and all thrs. within the space of the tenth part of one night. On his relating this extravagant fiction to the people the next morning after he pretended the thing to have happened, it was received by them, as it deserved, with a general outcry ; and the imposture was never in greater danger of being totally blasted, than by this ridiculous fable.

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