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MADE IN THE COURSE OF A

JOURNEY

THROUGH

FRANCE, ITALY, AND GERMANY.

By HESTER LYNCH PIOZZI.

IN TWO VOLUMES.

VOL. I.

LONDON:

Printed for A. STRAHAN; and T. CADELL in the Strand.

M DCC LXXXIX,

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PREFACE.

I

WAS made to obferve at Rome fome vef

tiges of an ancient custom very proper in those days-it was the parading of the streets by a set of people called Precia, who went fome minutes before the Flamen Dialis to bid the inhabitants leave work or play, and attend wholly to the proceffion; but if ill omens prevented the pageants from paffing, or if the occafion of the show was deemed fcarcely worthy its celebration, these Precia stood a chance of being ill-treated by the fpectators. A Prefatory introduction to a work like this, can hope little better ufage from the Public than they had; it proclaims the approach of what has often paffed by before, adorned most certainly

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tainly with greater fplendour, perhaps conducted too with greater regularity and skill: Yet will I not despair of giving at least a momentary amusement to my countrymen in general, while their entertainment fhall ferve as a vehicle for conveying expreffions of particu lar kindness to those foreign individuals, whose tenderness softened the forrows of abfence, and who eagerly endeavoured by unmerited attentions to fupply the lofs of their company on whom nature and habit had given me ftronger claims,

That I should make fome reflections, or write down fome obfervations, in the course of a long journey, is not ftrange; that I should prefent them before the Public is I hope not too daring the prefumption grew up out of their acknowledged favour, and if too kind culture has encouraged a coarse plant till it runs to feed, a little coldness from the fame quarter will foon prove fufficient to kill it. The flattering partiality of private partisans fometimes

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fometimes induces authors to venture forth, and ftand a public decifion; but it is often found to betray them too; not to be toffed by waves of perpetual contention, but rather to fink in the filence of total neglect. What wonder! He who swims in oil must be buoyant indeed, if he efcapes falling certainly, though gently, to the bottom; while he who commits his fafety to the bofom of the wideembracing ocean, is fure to be strongly fupported, or at worst thrown upon the shore.

On this principle it has been still my study to obtain from a humane and generous Public that shelter their protection best affords from the poisoned arrows of private malignity; for though it is not difficult to despise the attempts of petty malice, I will not say with the Philofopher, that I mean to build a monument to my fame with the ftones thrown at me to break my bones; nor yet pretend to the art of Swift's German Wonder-doer, who promised to make them fall about his

head

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